Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘The Netherlands’

Farewell, European Medicines Agency

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 26th January, 2019

ema closingYesterday, staff at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) in Canary Wharf, London, lowered the flags of the 28 EU member states in preparation for their move to the Netherlands. Following the vote for Brexit in the 2016 EU Referendum it was no longer tenable for the EMA to stay in Britain; the Dutch stepped in to help with the offer of temporary accommodation in Amsterdam’s Slotterdijk. That should be up and running by March, when the UK is due to leave the EU, unless Brexit is stopped or delayed. The departure of the EMA is a blow to Britain’s important role in the evaluation and supervision of medicines and is mirrored by the departure (actual or planned) of many commercial companies and financial institutions which also want to keep their headquarters in an EU member state. According to reports earlier this week, 250 companies currently in the UK are in talks with the Dutch authorities, while others are looking to other new locations. This Brexodus was inevitable as a consequence of the massive self-harm of Brexit. Brexiteers dubbed warnings about this “Project Fear”, whereas it is just plain fact. The UK has already lost billions of pounds because of Brexit and things will only get worse if Brexit goes ahead. A “No Deal” Brexit, which is the default position if Theresa May fails to get her deal (amended or otherwise) through Parliament, would be especially catastrophic, as supply chains will inevitably be disrupted. That includes supplies of medicines, many of which come from the continent, which is why some companies are busy stockpiling and the British government has bought a whole load of fridges as part of its contingency plans. No wonder diabetics and others who depend on the regular supply of drugs are worried. And the tragedy is that that this was all so unnecessary. As we wave farewell to the EMA we need to ask ourselves if this severance from the EU with the consequent reduction in benefits is really what the country needs.

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EU 2016: Dutch at the Helm

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 3rd January, 2016

Dutch EU presidency 2On 1 January the Netherlands took over the six-month rotating presidency of the European Union, with pledges to facilitate Europe’s economic growth and competitiveness, to enhance the EU’s role in the world, to promote forward-looking energy and climate policies, to improve cooperation on security as well as migration and asylum, and last but by no means least to empower European citizens by making them more involved in EU decision-making. These are in summary the five pillars agreed for the next 18-month period by the so-called Trio which will be at the helm until 30 June 2017: the Netherlands and their successors Slovakia and Malta. The role of the EU presidency has changed somewhat in recent years with the appointment of a President of the European Council — the gathering of EU Heads of Government — rather than that job being rotated twice a year along with the EU presidency. The incumbent as President of the Council since December 2014 is Donald Tusk, a former Polish Prime Minister. But the country that has the EU rotating presidency can still have a big influence in managing EU affairs, as well as hosting many meetings of the 28 member states. In the case of the Netherlands, well over 100 of these meetings will be held at the Maritime Museum in Amsterdam, underlining the importance of the EU’s being outward-looking.

Cameron Rutte 4The elephant in the room, not specifically mentioned in the Dutch programme of works, is trying to keep Britain as a member of the European Union. At a European Council meeting next month, the UK’s EU partners will respond fully to Prime Minister David Cameron’s four demands for EU reform, which he hopes can be the basis for then recommending that Britons vote to remain in the EU in a referendum that is likely to take place later this year. This could well prove to be the most tricky Council over which Mr Tusk will have to preside, as at least one of Mr Cameron’s demands — considerably extending the period during which EU migrants are unable to access benefits when in another member state than their own — has met great resistance, not least from Poland. Mr Cameron foolishly took the Conservative Party out of the largest European grouping in the EU, the European People’s Party (EPP) several years ago, which meant that he sacrificed a valuable opportunity to lobby and negotiate with EPP leaders, not least the German Chancellor, Angela Merkel. Yet paradoxically one of his greatest allies is neither in the EPP nor in the European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR), which the Tories formed with a rag-bag of right-wing parties from a few other countries, but instead with the Dutch Prime Minister, Mark Rutte. Mr Rutte leads the more conservative of the Netherlands’ two liberal parties, the VVD, and is therefore part of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), to which the British Liberal Democrats belong. But he has an excellent working relationship with Mr Cameron and as the Netherlands now has the EU presidency, 10 Downing Street will doubtless be hoping that the Dutch will facilitate a compromise that will deliver what Mr Cameron wants.

Link: http://english.eu2016.nl/

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Keeping European Extremism at Bay

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 14th December, 2015

EU imageThere was a collective sigh of relief among Europe’s mainstream body politic last night when the Front National failed to gain control of a single region of France. Marine Le Pen unsurprisingly blamed the electoral system, but the French model of two-round elections actually served the electorate well, as in many regions the two candidate run-off posed a simple question: do you want a FN administration or not? And the majority decided they did not, coming out to vote in larger numbers than in the first round and rallying behind whichever candidate from the centre left or centre right was left in the run-off. That’s the good news. But it should not blind us to the fact that both Ms Le Pen and her niece scored over 40% of the vote in their regions and that the FN is now the main opposition party in many areas of France. Their strong performance was undoubtedly helped by the murderous attacks by Islamist extremists in Paris last month, but that is not the only reason.

Nigel FarageThere has been a swing to right-wing, anti-immigrant parties in many parts of the EU, partly in response to the refugee and migrant crisis. Hungary has a particularly unpleasant government that enjoys strong public support and Polish voters moved to the right in recent elections. In the Netherlands, an anti-immigrant party is back leading some opinion polls after a period of decline. One brighter spot is the UK, where UKIP seems to be on the wane, having peaked at the European elections last year. But we cannot be complacent. When things go badly wrong in a society, whether relating to security or to the economy, the siren call of the far right will be appealing to a significant section of the population, which is why other parties, including the UK’s Liberal Democrats, need to have a clear and strong message to counter it.

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