Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Schengen’

Brexit Will Mean Airport Delays

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 2nd August, 2017

border controls smallThe Daily Mail and Daily Express are all in a lather today about the fact that many British holiday-makers have been hit by prolonged passport checks at continental airports, with the papers accusing the EU of punishing these poor sons of Albion. The irony could not be greater, given that these very same newspapers have been cheerleaders for Brexit, one of their main rallying calls being to end freedom of movement between Britain and the rest of the EU. Or are they stuck in a Victorian mentality, according to which the citizens of the then greatest nation on earth were exempt from restrictions imposed on Johnny Foreigner? But let’s be clear: if Brexit does go ahead, as the Conservative government intends, then delays at airports and ports all round Europe, including Britain, are bound to get worse. Freedom of Movement for EU citizens will end in March 2019, the government has announced, and that is bound to be reciprocal. Moreover, if the Conservatives and their Corbynite lackeys insist on pursuing a Hard Brexit, under which Britain leaves both the European single market and the Customs Union, then the situation will be even worse. Currently citizens of EEA member states, such as Norway and Iceland, can pass through the same quick immigration control channels as EU citizens, but if Britain isn’t even in the EEA after Brexit, we Brits will have to queue up with Chinese, Indian, American and every other non-European visitor for a full check. Given the numbers of people involved, the chaos is likely to be severe. And those of you who hope you might escape it by taking a ferry from Dover or one of the other UK ports be warned: the reimposition of full customs controls are going to cause massive tailbacks. Of course, were the UK part of Schengen Brits would not be subject to any controls when travelling to other countries in the Schengen area, which is the joy of real freedom of movement in most of Europe. But joining Schengen was never part of any British government’s programme. So, unless Brexit is stopped or is considerably softened, prepare for the worse in 2019 — or develop a taste for staycations.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

A Common EU Asylum Policy

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 7th June, 2012

Immigration and asylum are twin subjects that are guaranteed to get  Daily Mail columnists’  blood boiling; add the word Europe and the mix is toxic. Except that of course, in the real world, it isn’t. And indeed both the EU’s Council of Ministers and the European Parliament are hard at work on the construction of a common EU Immigration and Asylum Policy. This clearly makes sense for countries signed up to Schengen, as people can move freely between them. But the outsiders, including the UK, would do well to be fully involved. This afternoon, as the rainclouds delivered a Jubilee encore, Europe House (London HQ for the European Parliament and European Commission) hosted a seminar on the topic, asking the question ‘Is the UK in or out?’ I’m not sure we got a definitive answer to that, but in the meantime it was fascinating to hear from the very impressive Maltese MEP, Simon Busuttil, who is a leading EPP (centre-right) representative on the European Parliament’s committee dealing with Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs. He pointed out that last month, Maltese authorities rescued and brought to land 600 African migrants (mainly from Somalia) from small craft floundering in the sea. On a per capita basis, that is the equivalent of Britain taking in 90,000 refugees/migrants. Malta, Italy and Greece have really received the brunt of the influx of asylum seekers, legal and irregular migrants arriving from North Africa since the outbreak of the so-called Arab Spring. Obviously these initial host nations cannot be expected to shoulder all of the burden, even though an agreement signed in Dublin means that in principle asylum seekers must apply in the first EU country they arrive at, rather than cherry-picking among the rest. A European resettlement Plan is being discussed, but there is a degree of urgency. According to the EU’s timetable, there is meant to be a Common Immigration and Asylum Policy in place this year, though I suppose any delay could be solved by the old ruse of stopping the clocks at 23.59 on 31 December.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Bulgaria under the EU Spotlight

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 23rd July, 2008

The European Commission has suspended €500 million in funds destined for Bulgaria because of concerns over persistent corruption and organised crime. Both issues were highlighted in the the lead up to Bulgaria’s joining the EU in January last year, during which Sofia promised to tackle the twin problems, but as the Bulgarian Prime Minister, Sergei Stanishev, admits, ‘there is a discrepancy between the political will, which is a fact, and the achievement of concrete results.’ The Commission is also withdrawing the right of two Bulgarian agencies to administer EU funds.

Brussels hopes these measures will serve as a wake-up call to the Bulgarian government to get its house in order. An earlier draft of the Commission report was even tougher, threatening the suspension of Bulgaria’s progression to join both the Schengen area and the eurozone, but this was toned down at Sofia’s request. The pressure is really on Bulgaria now to show it can clean up its act, otherwise future enlargement, to take in countries such as Croatia, could be put at risk. I’ll be in Bulgaria next week, so I will be asking some tough questions.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »