Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Nazis’

Holocaust Memorial Day

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 27th January, 2019

auschwitz entranceOn this day we remember the six million Jews exterminated by the Nazis in Germany and the occupied territories, along with the Roma, disabled and LGBT people deemed imperfect or undesirable by the Third Reich. I was born five years after the War, but during my childhood the black and white pictures of Auschwitz and other death camps were a shocking reminder of what had happened not that long before. The slogan “Never Again” was popularised and for me came to embrace much more than concentration camps, as I hated the whole idea of war as well — especially the mindless death mill of the Western Front in the First World War and the millions of civilian casualties in the Second, along with the wholesale destruction of historic cities, their art and civilization. That is why I became such a strong supporter of the European Union — the European Project — as it developed, creating a Europe in which Never Again could be a reality, though on the fringes of the EU terrible things did happen, such as the massacre of young Muslims by Serbs at Srebrenica in 1995.

bosnia intenment cmpGenocide has reared its head in many parts of the world, from the killing fields of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia to the machete slaughter of Tutsis and Hutus in Rwanda. That is why Holocaust Memorial Day is so important, to remind us constantly of the barbarity that can be part of the human condition unless people are educated and structures put in place to make it impossible. I have often heard people in Britain saying complacently that it could never happen here, but such confidence is misplaced. Had the Nazis occupied mainland Britain I am sure they would have found some people willing to help them with their dirty work. If you don’t believe me, look at the hatred on the faces of some of the far right demonstrators who have taken to the streets in recent months, their intimidation of people they disagree with and the callous attitude to refugees and migrants rising their lives to get into Europe or across the Channel into Britain. “Let them drown!” I have heard people say, their “patriotic” sense of entitlement driving them to repel all boarders, cheered on by the more disgusting elements of the popular Press. For some Brits, “migrants” are not human, and once you start to dehumanise groups of people you have started on the slippery slope that can lead to genocide. The evidence is there; it has happened before.

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Parallel Lines

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 6th April, 2014

Peter LantosParallel LinesSo much has been written about the Holocaust that one might be forgiven in thinking that nothing new could be said about that monstrous period of inhumanity. But every so often a book comes along that proves that the last word has not been spoken. Such is Peter Lantos’s Parallel Lines (Arcadia Books, £9.99). Originally published in 2007, it has justly been repeatedly reprinted in paperback for the benefit of new readers. The sub-title of the book, “A Journey from Childhood to Belsen”, highlights a central strand of the narrative of Lantos’s memoir, but as well as the infant boy’s attempts to make sense of what was happening to him as his parents and he were plucked from their previously rather comfortable existence in the small Hungarian town of Makó, being sent first to a Jewish ghetto and then on to Bergen-Belsen (where his father perished), the story also sees the adult Lantos retracing steps, digging in archives, interviewing people to try to fit together pieces of the jigsaw that had just become a faded memory. There is ample evidence of brutality and suffering, as well as the wickedness of the Nazis, their Hungarian collaborators, and also “ordinary” people who took advantage of the Jews’ dispossession to hep themselves to property both large and small. Salvation for the boy and his mother came when an American unit rescued them from another train transportation away from Belsen that would almost certainly otherwise have taken them to their death. But their return to Makó turned out to be a reason for more trials and tribulation, as the Russians helped install an unforgiving Communist regime which treated them as class enemies. Lantos was very fortunate in being able to get out to pursue higher medical studies in England, which would eventually lead to a new life as a British citizen and an acclaimed writer, as well as distinguished in his medical profession. What is truly remarkable about Parallel Lines, however, is not just its moving portrayal of triumph over adversity but above all the self-evident humanity of the author, his refusal to hate, even his lively sense of humour. For though there is so much misery in the telling there are also moments that make one laugh out loud. A wonderful and memorable book, no matter how many other accounts of the Holocaust one has read.

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