Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Jeremy Corbyn’

The Putney and Wandsworth Euro-Hustings

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 15th May, 2019

Wandsworth hustingsThough this month’s European elections were organised in great haste in the UK (and through gritted teeth by the Conservative government), an admirable number of public hustings has been taking place round London, including one last night at St. Anne’s Church in Wandsworth, in which I took part. It was set up by the Putney and Wandsworth Societies and attracted about 100 members of the public, which was encouraging given the short notice. In fact there is far more interest in this set of European elections than ever before (and I can say that having stood in all but one of them!), to an extent becoming a sort of new referendum on whether Brits want to stay in the EU of not. Recent opinion polls confirm what I have been finding on the doorstep, namely that the electorate is polarising towards either Nigel Farage’s new Brexit Party or to the anti-Brexit Liberal Democrats (and to a lesser extent the Greens).

There was no Brexit candidate at last night’s hustings, bizarrely, though they were invited; maybe they knew they would get a frosty reception in such a pro-Remain part of the capital. However, UKIP was represented by Freddy Vachha, one of the more politely eccentric members of his party; he caused the biggest laugh of the evening by describing the Conservatives as neo-Marxist! The Conservatives had Scott Pattenden from Bromley, who had to counter some quite pointed questioning about Theresa May, David Cameron and the Brexit mess. The Greens were represented by Gulnar Hasnain, who adopted the line that the Greens are the largest pro-EU UK party in the outgoing European Parliament (true for 2014-2019, though that is unlikely to be the case after 23 May). ChangeUK’s candidate was Hasseeb Ur-Rehman, who essentially read a quite detailed policy paper in his allotted four minutes. Labour, naughtily sent not a Euro-candidate but the PPC for Putney, Fleur Anderson, which earned a rebuke from a Labour Party member in the audience. Fleur maintained that Labour is a Remain Party because the two leading MEP candidates are, but the audience wasn’t going to let that pass without adverse comment about Jeremy Corbyn and Lexit. I had a fairly easy ride as a LibDem, though inevitably came under fire from the small number of UKIP or Brexit Party supporters in the church, demanding to know why I was neither Liberal nor a Democrat by calling for a People’s Vote when there had already been a referendum in 2016. It was clear from the majority voices in the room, however, that a People’s Vote was a popular option for this audience, with a heavy preponderance of Remain.

Advertisements

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized, US politics | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The UK Local Elections Verdict

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 4th May, 2019

F5FF8AE5-5C6A-4797-B8A2-8AE9528248B4Now that the dust has settled on this week’s local elections In England — the biggest set of such elections since 2015, though not including London and various other cities and counties — the spin doctors of both the Conservative and Labour parties are in overdrive, bizarrely both pitching the same message that the massive gains by the anti-Brexit Liberal Democrats and substantial wins for the equally anti-Brexit Greens are somehow a sign that the public just wants the government to “get on” with Brexit — an aim shared by the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, despite the fact that Labour has registered a net loss of nearly 100 seats at a time when the worst government in living memory is staggering from one crisis and embarrassment to the next. Some noble Conservative and Labour MPs have bravely defied their masters and declared that this is tosh — some in far more rigorous terms than that. Others have parroted the official line.

30B377CD-DEBD-4E9C-856D-7A48E234FC92Nonetheless, as I tweeted earlier, this is an Orwellian misrepresentation of facts more reminiscent of the former Soviet Union than of a mature parliamentary democracy.  Such is the sorry state of political discourse in Britain since the 2016 EU Referendum. In that Referendum, tainted by some very dodgy campaigning and funding, Leave beat Remain by about 52:48. But the latest opinion poll out suggests that were such a referendum to be held today, Remain would get 61%. In the meantime the country is bitterly divided and Nigel Farage and his new Brexit Party will ensure that the political temperature is kept at boiling point. However, European elections loom on 23 May, and although Mr Farage will probably mop up previous UKIP voters and numerous right-wing Tories, both the Conservatives and Labour are likely to lose seats to pro-Remain parties. Will Mrs May and Mr Corbyn listen then? We must make them listen!

Posted in Brexit, UK politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Whitehall Farce

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 4th April, 2019

Dry RotThe chamber of the House of Commons was evacuated today as water started pouring in from the ceiling. The Palace of Westminster is literally falling apart, which is a brutally apt metaphor for the current political chaos. Meanwhile, in the House of Lords, arch-Brexiteers repeatedly tried to filibuster the bill put forward in the Commons by Yvette Cooper, aimed at avoiding a No Deal crash-our from the European Union. One noteworthy contribution in the Lords debate came from Viscount Ridley — one of the remaining hereditary peers — who referred to MPs as a “despotic majority”. You couldn’t make it up. Or on the other hand, maybe someone could. I am inevitably put in mind of the Whitehall Farces staged by Brian Rix at the Whitehall Theatre in London’s West End in the 1950s and 1960s — five in all, including Dry Rot and One for the Pot. Well, now there is a sixth, called Brexit, and it is taking place not only on the parliamentary stage of Westminster but also on TV and right across the whole gamut of media, old and new. I hear the cries of those who plead, “Oh, please just make it stop!” But whatever the outcome of the next few days, or the antics of Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn, this is a show that is likely to run and run. If some sort of Brexit deal is passed, there will then be years of haggling with the EU about the future relationship. And if by some miracle Brexit is cancelled, perhaps by revoking Article50, the increasingly tetchy public discourse will probably only intensify. Perhaps the only way to bring the curtain down is to have another referendum, the so-called People”s Vote, with everyone agreeing to abide by the outcome. Then the doors can be shut and everyone told to go home.

Posted in Brexit, UK politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Put It to the People

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 23rd March, 2019

Brexit march 1Today I went on the People’s Vote march against Brexit in central London, along with what the organisers say were more than one million people. I can’t authenticate that figure, but the demonstration was certainly bigger than the last one I went on. Liberal Democrats, unsurprisingly, were out in force. The front of the march had already reached Parliament Square before our section even got moving on Park Lane and it took me four hours to get from A to B. What was similar to previous events of this kind, however, was the good humour — not least in the home-made placards — and the great sense of solidarity even among those who would normally find themselves divided by politics or age. There was even a great samba drummers band to keep up the spirits. But there was also a sense of urgency, as Prime Minister Theresa May has so far continued to plough on with her bad Brexit deal, despite countless objections, and in principle Britain could crash out of the EU next Friday without a deal — though that possibility has mercifully been reduced by the willingness of the EU to give Britain an extension to Article 50 to try and sort things out.

Brexit march 2Next week in Parliament is going to be something to watch, as MPs try to seize greater control over the parliamentary agenda and various different possibilities are floated. At the moment, a People’s Vote or new referendum is not the most favoured option of a majority of MPs but it could develop into that as other options fall by the wayside. All those who witnessed the march must have been struck by the turnout and the passion. Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leader, pointedly absented himself for London, which is something I think he will very soon live to regret. Of course, if Article50 is prolonged beyond either of the two dates mentioned in Brussels on Thursday — 12 April or 22 May — then there will have to be European elections in the UK in late May, as indeed there should be. They will certainly be a good gauge of the popular mood if they happen. And having to closely got to being elected to the European Parliament twice, I shall certainly throw my hat in the ring.

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The Brexit Wrecking Ball

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 17th February, 2019

B14E3D6B-1E23-4C31-B818-F231C26D827FThe UK airline Flybmi is going into administration, citing Brexit uncertainty as the reason; there is no guarantee they will be able to fly between European destinations if Britain leaves the EU on 29 March as scheduled. The company is just one of many that are closing or else shifting their operations to another member state of the European Union. According to experts’ figures released this week, Brexit is costing the UK £800million a week, and we haven’t even left yet. Note that this is nearly twice what Brexiteers claimed we would save through Brexit, the windfall supposedly being passed to the NHS. It seems inconceivable that the Conservative Party, as the traditional party of Business, should allow this economic vandalism to take place. But the sad truth is that the Tory party has been taken over by right-wing, xenophobic Brexiteer extremists and Prime Minister Theresa May is more interested in saving her own political skin than saving the country.

BFA67A8C-098E-4D73-828E-ADFA9A4762FABrexit is now showing its true colours: it is a wrecking ball that is smashing many of the economic gains of recent years, as well as dividing society. Just how bad those divisions are has been shown by the violent confrontations outside Parliament — yellow-vested Brexiteers assaulting police yesterday — and the fact that several female Remainer MPs have been advised to move home or else avoid travelling alone in order to stay safe. Meanwhile, Parliament has shown itself incapable of uniting behind one forward course of action and the Labour Party Leader, Jeremy Corbyn, has proved to be miserably inadequate and indecisive, thus failing to provide a true Opposition. No wonder a number of both Labour and Conservative MPs are thinking of resigning their party whip, with the Conservatives in thrall to Jacob Rees-Mogg’s European Reform Group and Labour to what Mike Gapes MP has called a Stalinist cult.

1EC0B2E1-3999-4261-A6E2-50B828249EFAOpinion polls have recently consistently shown that were there to be a referendum on whether to accept Mrs May’s “deal” or to stay in the EU, a majority would vote to remain. The People’s Vote campaign, backed by the Liberal Democrats, SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Greens, is still keeping up the pressure and has called for a mass demonstration in London on 23 March, less than a week before D for Departure Day. One hopes that something significant may have happened before then — ideally extending Article 50 to allow for a People’s Vote. But it is important that people turn out in huge numbers on the March. Moreover, the organisers must ensure that EU citizens in the UK and UK citizens in the rest of the EU are properly represented, as they have more to lose personally than most of us.

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Brexit Does My Head In

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 29th January, 2019

depressed-manAccording to a new opinion poll from Channel 5 News and YouGov, one in ten people in Britain say that Brexit has had a large impact on their mental health. I know that is true in my case. Along with many Brits who believe that the country is better off inside the European Union I feel depressed and frustrated that the Conservative government is ploughing on with a course of action that is bound to harm the UK economy. In her desperate attempts to hold her party together, Prime Minister Theresa May is even continuing to flirt with the possibility of a disastrous No Deal Brexit, by which Britain would crash out of the EU on 29 March, with huge risks to the delivery of food and medicines and the supply chain of farming and industry. The Official Opposition is not much better either, as under Jeremy Corbyn Labour has failed to listen to the majority of its members who want an Exit from Brexit, probably through a referendum, dubbed the People’s Vote. Last night, Parliament debated the government’s disgraceful Immigration Bill, which will downgrade the status of EU citizens in this country if it is passed. Until almost the last minute the Labour leadership was saying that their MPs should abstain in the vote on this reading, until a howl of protest led to a partial U-turn, with a decision to oppose, but only on a one-line whip, which meant that not enough Labour MPs were in the chamber to vote it down (though some brave Tory rebels voted against). But if Brits like me have some sleepless nights over Brexit imagine how much worse it must be for EU citizens, many of whom have lived in this country for years and are now being required to apply for settled status so they have the right to stay in their own homes. Moreover, many EU citizens — and other foreigners — have been the butt of unpleasant xenophobic/racist abuse from a small minority of nationalistic bigots who have been empowered by the 2016 EU Referendum to vent their prejudices. Even speaking a language other than English in public is enough for some of these zealots to sound off. No wonder some people are turning to their doctors for prescriptions for anti-depressants. But given that physical exercise is known to alleviate depression, getting out and about campaigning for a People’s Vote is perhaps one route those of us who are feeling down about Brexit can follow.

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Britain All at Sea

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 18th January, 2019

britain all at seaOne of the most popular tropes of the colonial era was that Britain rules the waves. But for the country that once boasted that it had an empire on which the sun never set, another metaphor is more apt today: Britain is all at sea. Ever since the shock result of the EU Referendum in June 2016, the UK has been on a downward spiral in terms of international standing, while at the same time riven by increasingly bitter internal divisions. Prime Minister Theresa May called an unnecessary general election in 2017, saying she wanted a healthy mandate with which to negotiate with our 27 EU partners Britain’s orderly departure from the Union. Instead, she lost her parliamentary majority, but she decided to ignore the message of that and instead has ploughed on with her vision of Brexit. This she has continued to do single mindedly ever since, losing several Brexit Ministers along the way. The deal she ended up with pleases nobody, yet she is insisting that the choice now before the country is between that and a catastrophic No Deal crashing out of the EU on 29 March.

leave means leave Parliament blew a giant raspberry at her deal the other day, defeating it by an historic 230 votes, yet she continues to press on with it, like a stubborn ox. The Leader of the Official Opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, meanwhile flaps around like an impotent mynah bird screeching “General election! General election!”, though there is no way the Conservatives and the Northern Irish DUP who prop them up are going to back one. And meanwhile the clock ticks on to Brexit departure day. Just how near to the deadline will it have to come before the Government blinks and either asks for an extension of Article 50 (or, preferably, rescinds it)? Meanwhile, the arch-Brexiteers have gone into full Blitz spirit, savouring the prospect of Britain standing alone, even if life will be more difficult. At a Leave Means Leave rally in central London last night, the more radical Leave supporters celebrated the notion of No Deal. Just show two fingers to the rest of the Europe, they argued,. And to Scotland and Northern Ireland (both of which voted Remain in 2016). And to Remainers. No wonder the rest of the world thinks Britain has gone completely mad, bobbing along in a leaking boat in the mid-Atlantic, singing Rule Britannia, as it risks sinks beneath the waves.

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Corbyn Slides off the Brexit Fence

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 22nd December, 2018

D36324D0-9152-474E-A3BC-BAB6AFD2BF61For months senior Labour politicians have been telling us that “all options remain on the table” regarding the Party’s policy on Brexit. In other words, Labour could possibly back a People’s Vote and campaign for Remain, which opinion polls tell us is what a significant majority of Labour members want. But the Party leadership clearly thinks otherwise. Jeremy Corbyn — probably encouraged by his two left-hand men, Seamus Milne and Len McCluskey — has made clear in an interview with the Guardian that if Labour wins a hypothetical election next year, Brexit would still go ahead. This is a clear betrayal not only of the millions of Remain-supporting electors who voted Labour in the 2017 general election in protest at Theresa May’s Brexit plans but also of the Labour Party’s autumn conference this year, which adopted a nuanced stance leaving various options open. Recently, both Jeremy Corbyn and Diane Abbott have been making disgraceful, unsubstantiated comments about EU migrants pushing down wages, while attacking the principle of Freedom of Movement. Of course, no-one should be surprised that Jeremy Corbyn is at heart a Brexiteer, despite campaigning half-heartedly for Remain in 2016. The day after the EU Referendum, he called for Article 50 to be invoked immediately. Ideologically locked into 1970s socialism, he sees the EU as an impediment to his dream of a Utopian Britain, in which he could just dole out state money to support or create industries irrespective of economic viability. But with only three months to go before Britain’s scheduled departure from the EU it is now crunch time. Labour Remainers need to stop rabbiting on about having a general election (which the Conservative and DUP MPs won’t vote for anyway). Instead, the focus should be on getting a People’s Vote, with an option to remain, which would have wide cross-Party support in the House of Commons. If necessary, Labour MPs need to have the courage to sideline Mr Corbyn. The future of Britain is at stake.

Posted in Brexit, UK politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Armistice 2018 Commemoration

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 11th November, 2018

3FD0BB67-E403-4016-BDB7-B1A8C5D35606I found pictures of the Armistice Day commemorations in Paris today deeply moving. President Emmanuel Macron spoke with dignity against nationalism and war. The German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, stood next to him, underlining how these two great European powers, which had fought each other three times during a period of just 75 years, are now allies and the mainstay of the European Union — a body which now unites not just most of the countries of Western Europe but also the formerly Communist states of central and Eastern Europe. It was good that both Vladimir Putin and Donald Trump were present, too (even if Trump blotted his copybook by pulling out of an earlier, related engagement because rain was forecast). Despite some recent tensions in the West’s relations with Russia, the Cold War, which kept us teetering on the verge of nuclear Armageddon, is long over. Scores of nations were represented at senior level in Paris, but shamefully Theresa May was not there. Apparently she thought it more important to be at the Cenitaph in London rather than participate in this unique, truly global event. Reportedly she sent David Lidington MP (Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster) instead, though naturally he did not get to stand with the top leaders, thus relegating the UK to second rank. At a time when Britain’s reputation is at rock bottom among our EU partners as Brexit loooms and many Conservative and Labour politicians fall over themselves to be rude to the EU and the 27 other member states, while banging the drum of British exceptionalism, this was a serious miscalculation. Theresa May is trashing the UK’s standing in Europe and the wider world, while Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn just stands on the sideline, nodding.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

700,000 March for a People’s Vote

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 21st October, 2018

March for the FutureCentral London was brought to a standstill yesterday when an estimated 700,000 people marched from Park Lane to Parliament Square calling for a “Final Say” on any proposed deal between Britain and the EU — with an option to remain in membership. So many people turned up, from all round the country — far more than even the organisers expected — that there wasn’t room for everyone to fit into Whitehall and Parliament Square. The weather was glorious and the atmosphere festive, despite occasional small groups of Brexiteers heckling from the sidelines. A number of MPs from all parties took part, though one conspicuous absentee was Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn, who reportedly ordered his front-bench team not to go. As Mr Corbyn has been a serial protester for decades and this was the biggest demonstration since the anti-Iraq War march 15 years ago the message could not be clearer: the Labour leadership is not listening to the overwhelming majority of the party’s membership who want Britain to remain in the EU.

March for the Future 1Prime Minister Theresa May, meanwhile, is sticking to her line that there won’t be another public vote on Brexit, but as time goes by and she has failed to come up up with a deal, it is quite possible that she won’t be Prime Minister next year. The scheduled date for the UK’s departure from the bloc is 29 March 2019, but there are growing calls for the so-called Article 50 period to be extended or for some other fudge to be agreed that will essentially allow Britain to remain part of the EU’s single market and customs union for a while until a solution to such thorny issues as the land border on the island of Ireland are sorted out. It may well be that some problems just can’t be sorted out and that the numbers of people opposing Brexit will swell further as they realise that they were sold a pup during the 2016 EU Referendum by the false promises of the Leave campaign. Yesterday’s demo was so large that even the BBC had to take notice and some of the foreign TV coverage was spectacular. It’s good that our EU partners and the wider world knows that even if the Conservative government has lost its marbles over Brexit — cheered on by the even more extreme DUP from Northern Ireland — millions of Britons know Brexit is a terrible mistake — and that includes many who voted Leave two years ago.

Posted in Brexit, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »