Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘ICC’

I Cannot Mourn Ariel Sharon

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 13th January, 2014

Ariel SharonIt is often said that one should not speak ill of the dead, but as a Quaker I believe one should speak truth to power, and be forthright about the powerful when necessary. At Mr Sharon’s state funeral in Israel the eulogies lauded an “indomitable” figure, but passed over the fact that he was one of the most ruthless and disastrous Prime Ministers Israel has had. He made Bibi Netanyahu seem a dove. Sharon was on record as saying that he believed that apartheid South Africa’s system of bantustans for the blacks was a good model for Israel to follow regarding the Palestinians in the occupied West Bank. Worse was his role in the Sabra and Shatila massacres in Lebanon. He should have been hauled before the International Criminal Court in The Hague for that alone. He was also instrumental in triggering the second Palestinian intifada with his deliberately provocative visit to the al-Aqsa Mosquie in Jerusalem. I pity his family for the stress they must have felt during his eight years lying in a coma. But I do not lament his passing. Some people bring light into the world. Sharon brought darkness and death.

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What Can We Do about Syria?

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 17th September, 2013

Bashar al-AssadUNSCJust because the House of Commons recently voted against military action in Syria does not mean that Britain or indeed the West can walk away from the tragic situation there. As I said in a speech at the Liberal Democrat conference in Glasgow this morning, we still have a moral obligation to act under Responsibility to Protect (R2P). That is the evolving doctrine in International Law that when a country’s government is unable or unwilling to protect its population from humanitarian catastrophe or gross human rights abuses the international community must. Military action is only a last resort under R2P, and I am not alone in being relieved that we have not gone to war over Syria, as I fear it would only have made the situation worse. But we need to work closely with Syria’s allies, Russia and Iran, to get action taken, over and above the considerable amount of humanitarian aid that Britain and some others have been providing. I praised the UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon for sticking his neck out in calling for the Assad regime to be referred to the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague, and indeed the UN Security Council should pass a resolution to that effect. Moreover, there has been a UN Commission on Syria in existence for over two years but the government in Damascus has not let it in to investigate. The UN (and again Russia) should use every means to force it to allow the team in, as it did with the chemical weapons inspectors. In the meantime, we should have no illusions about the Assads and their cohorts; this is a regime that has no compunction about shelling hospitals, persecuting doctors who treat the wounded or even torturing children in front of their parents. The situation in Syria today is a stain on the modern world and the international community — including the Arab League — must find a way of getting rid of it.

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Could the G20 Sort out Syria?

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 2nd September, 2013

Assad and PutinRussia G20I don’t always agree with (Lord) David Owen, but he made a valid point in an op ed piece in today’s London’s Evening Standard when he suggested that the G20 Summit in St Petersburg later this week could offer an important opportunity for negotiations to find a way out of the Syria impasse. The host of the Summit, of course, is Vladimir Putin, who is Bashar al-Assad’s closest European ally. And the G20 brings together an interesting mix of developed, emerging and developing countries: the Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, UK and US, plus the European Union. It is clear that there is stalemate on the ground in Syria; Assad is not losing, but he’s not winning either, and in the meantime yet more people get killed — over 110,00 already — and more refugees are created. The Syrian economy, as well as the country’s infrastructure and heritage, is being systematically destroyed. Despite the UK Parliament’s rejection of a military option last Thursday, it is still possible that the United States (if President Obama persuades Congress), France and Turkey may take part in a strike. But what exactly would that achieve. The Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, wrote in a piece in this morning’s Daily Telegraph that it would be possible to call another vote in the Commons and that the aim of any military strike should be to punish Bashar al-Assad. Well, there is a growing consensus that the Assad regime was responsible for the 21 August chemical weapons attack; the NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen was the latest authority to state that today. But as I said in a live interview on BBC Radio London this evening, surely the way to “punish” Assad and his clique would be to bring them before the ICC in The Hague, to face charges of crimes against humanity. I genuinely believe that is the best outcome, though I have no illusions about how difficult it may be to get him and his cohorts to The Hague. In the meantime, surely the prime concern must be to prevent as many deaths and as much suffering as possible. And the only plausible way to do that is convene the Geneva 2 peace conference that has been in the air for some time now. It may be uncomfortable to sit down with a dictator, but that may be the only sensible option — and it won’t happen unless Mr Putin is on board.

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Gaddafi: The End of an Era

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 20th October, 2011

The capture and fatal shooting of Libya’s long-time dictator Muammar Gaddafi brings to an end over four decades of the country’s Green Revolution. It is hard to remember now that when he first came to power there was widespread jubilation in Libya. But like many rulers who stay in office too long, he got more ruthless and despotic as the years went by, and he failed to ensure that the people benefitted from the country’s oil wealth. Gaddafi and his henchmen liked to pretend that Libya was run by people’s committees, and that he had no direct control himself. But everyone in Libya knew that was a lie and that even the hint of opposition could land one in jail, where torture was endemic and where hundreds, maybe thousands, of people were executed. I visited Libya many times over the past 20 years, travelling from west to east and north to south, much of it in a four-wheel drive. I was well aware how deeply the people of Benghazi in particular hated Gaddafi, but I also knew he had his supporters in Tripoli, Sirte and elsewhere. It is a remarkable tribute to the NTC forces (‘the rebels’, who must now be called the government) than they managed to topple the regime, albeit with assistance from NATO, Qatar and the UAE. Now comes the difficult task of reconstruction and reconciliation; one can only hope that the journey ahead is smoother than that being experienced next door in Egypt. For today, though, the mood amongst most, though not all, Libyans is one of celebration. The man who could have ordered their death on a whim has been dragged out of the pipe in which he was hiding and shot. Of course, those of us in the liberal West would have preferred to see him captured alive and brought to the International Criminal Court in The Hague, to be tried on charges of crimes against humanity. But many Libyans are just glad the nightmare is over and that Gaddafi perished inside the country he plundered for 42 years.

 

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The Bell Tolls for Dictators

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 22nd August, 2011

Like many bloggers and tweeters I stayed up late last night, transfixed by the scenes in Tripoli, where the National Liberation Army (as I prefer to call it) penetrated neighbourhoods of the city, including the iconic Green Square, which was immediately renamed Martyrs’ Square. At least two of Mouammar Gaddafi’s sons have been captured and it can only be a matter of time before Gaddafi himself is cornered. Will he do a Hitler and shoot himself, or arrange things so that he gets killed? Or will the cause of justice be served by him and some of his closest associates being taken to the International Criminal Court (ICC)? It’s staggering to think how fast events have moved since the impoverished Tunisian fruit-vendor Mohamed Bouazizi immolated himself last December. The Tunisian President Ben Ali fled to Saudi Arabia, Egypt’s President Mubarak was forced to resign and is now on trial, Yemen’s President Saleh was seriously injured in clashes during the uprising to oust him and remains in hospital in Saudi Arabia — which has a reputation now as the retirement home for dictators, beginning with Uganda’s Idi Amin. And now Gaddafi’s day of judgement is nigh. To remind ourselves of the speed and significance of these events, just take a look at the photo here of the four dictators looking so pleased with themselves at an African Union Summit last year. And next? Syria, inshallah.

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Syria’s Agony

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 1st August, 2011

The murderous crackdown against protestors taking place in Syria is a scandal of global proportions. Bashar al-Assad and his clique have lost any legitimacy to rule over the country and deserve to be arraigned in front of the ICC. It was thought that bloody massacres were a thing of the past (viz Hama in 1982), but now they are happening again before our eyes. These days, we know more about such terrible events because even if foreign media are being kept out, enough information and chilling YouTube footage is getting out of the country. The leaders of Russia and China, who have so far refused to countenance any strong condemnatory stance by the United Nations Security Council should be forced to sit and watch the pictures of killed and maimed civilians (including children) non-stop, hour after hour. The West has spoken out strongly, including Britain, but words are not enough. I agree with those who say it would be disastrous to try any sort of military intervention (even if enough countries were prepared to take part in it). The whole region could go up in flames. But there are much tougher sanctions that could be put in place and the message has got to get across to al-Assad and the whole tyrranical regime: Your time is up!

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Historic First for International Criminal Court

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 26th January, 2009

More than six years after the International Criminal Court was established in The Hague as a permanent war crimes tribunal, its first case opened today. The defendant (who has pleaded not guilty) is Thomas Lubanga, leader of the Union of Congolese Patriots, who is charged with conscripting children under the age of 15 to kill, rape and pillage ethnic Lendus in the Democratic Republic of Congo between 1998 and 2003. More people have died as a result of the fighting in Congo than in any other modern conflict, but the crimes Thomas Lubanga is accused of are especially chilling — basically turning youngsters into automated killing machines through brutality and fear. As the Argentinian Chief Prosecutor at the ICC, Luis Moreno-Ocampo, says, ‘the children still suffer the consequences of Lubanga’s crimes’.

Other people the ICC would like to get its hands on include Joseph Kony, leader of the Ugandan rebel Lord’s Resistance Army and — more controversially — President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan (over Darfur). But that is easier said than done. Many governments do not wish to cooperate with the ICC. Indeed, a significant number of countries have refused to sign up to the Court, including the United States, China, several Arab states and Israel. The Bush administration justified its boycotting of the ICC on the grounds that malicious prosecutions might be brought againt US troops for their actions in Iraq and elsewhere. Similarly, the Israeli Prime Miniseter, Ehud Olmert, has just declared that the Israeli government will ensure that no Israeli soldier will be at risk of prosecution for alleged war crimes in the recent operation in Gaza.

Despite these handicaps, this has been an historic day at the ICC. Those of us in Europe and elswhere who want to see a world in which no-one is beyond the reach of justice when they commit horrendous crimes should take encouragement from this and start to put pressure on Barack Obama and others to ensure that every self-declared democratic nation proves its commitment to the rule of international law by endorsing the ICC.

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