Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Emmanuel Macron’

Europe Coalesces as Britain Falls Apart

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 10th November, 2017

D1AF3920-7B78-406C-A1FD-FA42B713BF62In last year’s European Referendum, UKIP and other arch-Brexiteers argued that the European Union is sinking and is bound to break up, whereas the developments of the past few months have shown that, on the contrary, the EU is pulling together while Britain, mismanaged by a Brexit-drunk Tory Party, is steering the country straight for the rocks. A year ago, the UK was one of the fastest growing countries in the OECD, whereas now it has sunk to the bottom. In contrast, even the previously afflicted nations of Southern Europe are picking up. Moreover, since Emmanuel Macron became President of France, there is a new spring in the EU’s step; “Mutti” Merkel is no longer the sole voice of EU strength. The Franco-German alliance is back with force. The great tragedy is that Britain ought to be one of a troika helping direct the EU, at a moment when China and other emerging economies are in the ascendant. Instead, craven to Little Englander nationalists and the running dogs of global capitalism, Theresa May and her unholy crew are deliberately destroying Britain in order the try to satisfy the most extreme Btexiteers. Britain can have a golden future, as a leading member of the European Union. Cast adrift, alone, it’s bones will be picked over by the carrion crows who unfortunately own the worst parts of the British media, and to whose insistent tune Mrs May dances along with Mad Hatter Boris Johnson and the rest of that unsavoury crew.

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Posted in Brexit, David Owen, Diplomacy, education, elections, Estonia, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Abu Dhabi’s Cultural Pitch

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 8th November, 2017

6D096216-E244-4129-8838-39695569659EThe French President, Emmanuel Macron, is here in Abu Dhabi today, for the formal inauguration of the Abu Dhabi Louvre, a $1bn+ museum that will show several hundred works on loan from its Paris “mother” institution, including a Van Gogh self-portrait and Leonardo da Vinci’s “La Belle Ferroniere”. Located on Saadiyat Island and designed by Jean Nouvel, the museum aims to evoke the atmosphere of an Arab medina, as seen by a modern cinematographer; a silver-toned dome with perforated arabesque patterns “floats” above the white galleries, creating what Nouvel describes as a “rain of light”. Though there is a small section of modern art, including work by China’s Ai Weiwei, the main emphasis is on artistic treasures of the past, including religious works. Symbolically, a Yemeni Torah, a Gothic Bible and a very early Koran are placed together, open at verses that echo each other’s messages. The Abu Dhabi Louvre has been a decade in the making and is the first of three museums that will grace Saadiyat Island, the others being a Guggenheim, designed by Frank Gehry, and Norman Foster’s Zayed National Museum. Though for the next three days only playing host to local and foreign dignitaries, including King Mohammed VI of Morocco, the Abu Dhabi Louvre will open to the public from this Saturday. Abu Dhabi has always tried to distinguish itself from flashier Dubai next door, and with its trio of new museums it could not be trumpeting more loudly: Culture Is Us!

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Britain’s Wasted Opportunity

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 2nd July, 2017

Macron MerkelThis weekend the United Kingdom was due to take over the six-month rotating presidency of the European Union, but as the government in London is focussed on Brexit it declined the honour. Estonia has stepped up to the plate instead, and its progressive, tech-savvy Liberal government will doubtless make a good fist of it. But what a wasted opportunity for Britain! Two years ago, the then Pime Minister, David Cameron, said he was in poursuit of EU reforms but by unwisely pressing ahead with the EU Referendum before any significant reforms had taken place he was almost condemning Britain to leave. The tragedy is that now that Emannuel Macron is in the Elysée Palace, he and Germany’s Angela Merkel can be the dynamic duo promoting change. Of course this is not the first time that France and Germany have ruled the European roost, but had Britain stuck in there we could have seen a powerful triumvirate, with London, Paris and Berlin all determined to see a more efficient and forward-looking European Union.

Boris During the referendum campaign in the UK, Brexiteers argued that by leaving the EU Britain would “free” itself and be able to capitalise on new market opportunities. But what is abundantly clear is that instead the UK is in the process of cutting itself off from its biggest trading partner, alienating our friends and neighbours and is apparently in danger of heading for an economic recession. A year ago, we had the fastest growing economy among the G7, whereas now we have the slowest, and whereas wages have grown in other G7 countries here they have fallen, accentuating the pain of austerity. The Brexiteers claimed that the EU was a sinking ship and that we were better off jumping overboard. But that argument will look ever more fanciful as Britain gets tossed around in choppy waters while the EU steams confidently on ahead.

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Not a Happy Anniversary

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 23rd June, 2017

Today is the first anniversary of Britain’s EU Referendum. Doubtless some arch-Brexiteers, such as Nigel Farage and Jacob Rees-Maggie, have been celebrating what they consider to be the UK’s first anniversary of independence. This is of course tosh, on almost every level. We are still members of the EU until at least 29 March 2019, but more importantly, being an EU member state does not undermine a country’s independence, but rather member states voluntarily share aspects of sovereignty for the common good. Britain has done very well as an EU member state, though not a single UK Prime Minister since we joined in 1973 took full advantage of the opportunities offered. Theresa May, or whoever will replace her, can only look on impotently over the coming months as Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron help fashion a reformed and confident EU, in which the UK will have no formal role, unless Brexit is reversed, which at present seems unlikely. Last year I came to Lisbon  immediately after the Referendum, to salve my wounds with some continental culture and joie de vivre. By coincidence, I am in Lisbon again now, but this evening I did not raise my glass to celebrate the Brexit vote but rather to savour being a full European citizen while I still can.

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Dump Trump

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 27th May, 2017

G7 SummitThe body-language at the G7 Summit in Taormina this weekend has been absolutely fascinating. Emmanuel Macron made a beeline for Angela Merkel, and rightly so. This is now Europe’s political power couple and their joint determination to reform the European Union is something we should all warmly welcome. This makes it doubly tragic that Britain is walking away from the EU, seemingly as ungraciously as possible, with Theresa May at the helm. To think that the UK was due to take on the six-month rotating presidency of the EU on 1 July and that the British Prime Minister could then have been part of a triumvirate of leaders helping promote positive change. Instead, Mrs May has thrown away any chance of being taken seriously by her continental and Irish counterparts and hovers on the fringes of EU meetings like a sad aunt whom nobody loves.

Trump May Even at the G7 Summit she was at one moment pictured looking down in the dumps seated next to Donald Trump, who was pointedly ignoring her. So much for the special relationship! That relationship has anyway been soured as the British intelligence services have unilaterally stopped sharing sensitive information with the Americans as Trump’s White House is as leaky as a colander, as well as apparently having an open hotline to the Kremlin. So while Donald Trump stared into the distance, presumably already bored with the whole thing and tetchy because people were not fawning around him, Angela Merkel turned her cheek to be kissed by Canada’s Justin Trudeau (well, who wouldn’t?). It became ever more noticeable that there are two wallflowers in the G7 now: Trump and May, and Mrs May probably now rues the day she allowed the orange-hued POTUS to grab her hand so forcefully in the White House. Trump is in especially bad odour with everybody else in the G7 because he may well scupper the Paris climate agreement. Teasingly, he said he’d let the others know next week. This is the future of the planet he’s casually playing with! So, dear Americans, the ball is in your court. Most of Europe is saying to you imploringly: Dump Trump! Certainly don’t re-elect him in 2020. But if you can get rid of him through impeachment or whatever in the meantime, please do so. He’s not just a national embarrassment for you. He is globally toxic.

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On the Theme of Islands

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 9th May, 2017

Europe Day concert 2017The annual Europe Day concert in St. John’s Smith Square is always an emotional occasion for me. Although I abandoned any ambition for a musical career in my early teens, music still has the ability to move me more than any other art form. So strong is its influence that I cannot write with music on in the background, as it distracts my mind from the task at hand. But it’s not just the music that stirs my emotions on Europe Day; my belief in the European project is unshaken, while arguing that the EU should certainly reform — as many political leaders on the continent, such as the European Commission’s Foreign Affairs supremo, Federica Mogherini, now concede. And yes, Beethoven’s Ode to Joy does sometimes bring tears to my eyes. How brave Emmanuel Macron was to use that European anthem for his victory celebration in the Louvre on Sunday, rather than the Marseillaise! Would even Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron dare to do that in the UK? I have attended several Europe Day concerts and for me tonight’s programme beat all previous offerings. The Maltese presidency chose a subject thread for the evening: Music on the Theme of Islands — underlining not only Malta’s maritime history but also the situation of the British Isles, too. There was a brilliant selection of both orchestral and choral music, from Sibelius’s The Tempest to Martinú’s Ariane. Of course, there was an added edge to this evening’s concert as everyone was aware that it might be the penultimate occasion of its kind, assuming Britain leaves the EU by the end of March 2019. In common with many people in the church this evening, I find that a matter of immense sadness. But while I would prefer to stop Brexit in its tracks it is absolutely vital that a Hard Brexit is avoided and that the UK maintains as close a connection with the EU27 as possible.

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France: Fingers Crossed for Macron

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 23rd April, 2017

emmanuel-macronVoters in France go to the polls today in the first round of presidential elections. If the opinion polls are right, none of the 11 candidates is likely to garner as much as a quarter of the votes, but what is crucial under the French voting system is which two come first and second — even if there are only a few votes between second and third — as there will be a run-off between the two front runners in a second round of voting in two weeks’ time. Pundits on both sides of the Channel are agreed that what one might call “traditional” party’s candidates are unlikely to make the grade. More probable is that the centrist former investment banker and civil servant, Emmanuel Macron, who has never held elected office, will go head-to-head with Marine Le Pen of the far-right Front National dynasty. One has to note that the leftist Socialist Jean-Luc Mélenchon has been surging in the polls recently and it’s not impossible that the conservative Francois Fillon, recently accused of nepotism, might rally. So all is still to play for as voters make up their minds. Indeed, in the turbulent Western politics post-Brexit and Trump it maybe rash to even try to predict the outcome. What may be crucial is the turn-out; voting in France is not compulsory and some disillusioned voters may decide to stay at home. Even if Le Pen’s supporters may be more highly motivated (especially after the recent shooting of a policeman by a Frenchman of North African origin), which could mean she might just sneak into first place, most commentators believe she would be trashed in the second round. That is what happened to her father, Jean-Marie Le Pen, when Jacques Chirac wiped the floor with him in the second round in 2002 (though I suspect Marine could poll better than her father’s final tally of just under 18%). The question therefore is: who is best placed to beat Marine, even if in principle any of the leading contenders should be able to? I believe the answer to that is Emmanuel Macron, not just because he is new, looks good and is clearly intelligent, but for two other reasons related to policy. The first is that he is a keen European (unlike Marine, who argues for a “Frexit”, and is unsurprisingly chummy with Russia’s Vladimir Putin). The other reason is that Macron understands that if France is to compete effectively it has to reform its attitude to work, deregulation and so on. The economy needs a shake-up, which would benefit not only France but help strengthen the eurozone. That’s important for Britain’s trading future, too, whatever form of Brexit emerges from the May government’s current quagmire.

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