Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Chris Naylor’

Postcards from the Middle East

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 11th April, 2015

Postcards from the Middle Eastwetlands LebanonThe British naturalist and Christian missionary, Chris Naylor, has spent much of his working life so far in Arab lands, and like many others before him he was seduced by the difference from Britain. He and his wife’s first appointment in 1989 was to Kuwait, which is not the easiest or most interesting place in the Gulf for an expatriate to live, though they managed to make a visit by car the following year to see some of the great historical sites in Iraq, Mercifully, they were on leave in the UK  that summer when the Iraqis invaded Kuwait, though they had to fret about colleagues and friends (and all their belongings) left behind. Four years later, by now with two small children, they moved to Amman in Jordan, before settling in the Beka’a Valley in Lebanon and later Beirut for well over a decade. Accordingly, Naylor’s paperback book of memories, Postcards from the Middle East (Lion, £8.99), is really a selection of postcards from the Gulf and the neighbourhood plus a very long letter from Lebanon, to which the family became deeply attached. Initially working as a teacher, Naylor switched to being a conservation activist and administrator and much of the book is about the wetlands in Lebanon where he did much of his work, but seen against the counterpoint of political developments, including the Syrian occupation, 9/11, Rafik Hariri’s assassination and the Israeli-Hezbollah war. Family unity (a third child now having materialised) clearly kept the Naylors grounded through stressful times, as did the fellowship of Lebanon’s large Christian community. But the author clearly felt an empathy with the Lebanese in particular that transcended ethnic and religious boundaries and which inevitably left him feeling a sense of loss when eventually he and his family decided to relocate back to England. This book therefore has many threads and while specialists in the Middle East may not find much of great import in it, though the conservation material may well be new to them, as an account of cross-cultural accommodation and acceptance as well as of the learning process needed to live in a wildly different society it certainly has its pertinence and charm.

Link: https://www.facebook.com/PostcardsMiddleEast

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Electrical Safety First

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 7th April, 2014

Electrical Safety FirstOne of the joys of be a European politician — at least, from my point of view — is that almost daily one is confronted with an issue that deserves careful study and sometimes a practical or even legislative response. So I was particularly pleased this evening to take part in a dinner briefing and discussion session with Electrical Safety First (formerly the Electrical Safety Council), examining matters ranging from fatal household fires caused by faulty electrical wiring or equipment to product recall. Fellow LibDem politicians there were Mike Hancock MP (Eastleigh), Lords Dykes and Tope and Baroness Tonge (whose own daughter was the victim of an awful fatal electrical accident), and Councillors Richard Kemp (Liverpool), Michael Bukola (Southwark), Chris Naylor (Camden) and Simon James (Kingston). Simon is also one of my fellow Euro-candidates (as well as on the Council of Europe’s equivalent of the committee of the regions), and so too is Turhan Ozen (also LibDem PPC for Totenham) who was present. In my short remarks I stressed that although I am a keen European, and have been following European affairs ever since Reuters sent me to Brussels in 1974, nonetheless I don’t believe there has to be a European law for everything. However, clearly in the field of consumer protection the EU does have a role to play in setting standards and guidelines (as, for example, with food quality), even if most of the relevant laws should be national or even regional or local. In the UK there is a general trend towards less EU regulation, but I have always argued that the EU should do less, better. In the field of consumer protection relating to electrical goods and appliances that obviously should include compulsory safety levels, and maybe qualifications/training for electricians, though it does not necessarily have to go into the minutiae of plugs, sockets, fuses, etc. But as others round the table rightly stressed, a lot needs to be done at a local level, not only protecting council tenants but also private rental properties. It’s obligatory for gas safety, so why not for electricity, which can be just as fatal. So for me this was an extremely productive evening. I learned a lot, but also I realsied that if I do get elected on 22 May there are some very practical things I can be pushing for to help consumers in London.

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