Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Posts Tagged ‘Central America’

Central American Independence Day

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 16th September, 2017

IMG_2772Last night I nipped back to London from the Liberal Democrat conference in Bournemouth to attend the Central Independence Day celebration at the Churchill Hotel. It’s a unique event in the diplomatic calendar, as five countries mark their freedom on the same day: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In a nice gesture of solidarity, the much younger state of Belize (former British Honduras) was represented as well, and the Commonwealth Secretary General, Patricia Scotland, attended. As Her Majesty’s Marshal of the Diplomatic Corps, Alistair Harrison, commented in a short speech, it was all a great example of growing regional cooperation (the unspoken parenthesis being “in contrast to the UK and Brexit”). As an unreconstructed foodie, I could not but notice that the catering was stunning, including quite the best cured salmon (with sour cream, capers, chopped onion and lemon) I have ever had. Each of the Central American embassies had also brought along the finest examples of their national rums — for me, as a rum-baba of long standing, the Guatemalan was the pick of the crop. Representatives of the Mes Amigo, the London month of celebration of things Ibero-American, were out in force, so it was altogether a fiesta to remember.

Advertisements

Posted in Diplomacy, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

We Mustn’t Take Peace for Granted

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 12th April, 2014

Battle of the SommeIn this centenary year of the outbreak of the First World War many minds have been turning to the issues of war and peace, and when I make speeches at hustings or rallies in the current European election campaign I always make the point that the founding fathers of what is now the European Union wanted to enmesh the economies of France and Germany (in particular) so that war in western Europe would be unthinkable. And so it appears. But it is all too easy for us today to take that for granted. As a child of the 1950s, I was very much aware of the legacy of the Second World War — the bomb sites, the drab unpainted unrestored buildings, the dreary food and the tail-end of rationing — but I was too young to see National Service. So it was perhaps a little perverse of me to go off to war voluntarily at the age of 18 — as a journalist in Vietnam. What I saw there burned into my heart a hatred for war and for all the human emotions connected with it. I attended my first Quaker meeting there, and joined the Society of Friends when I went up to Oxford. And although Reuters sent me off to comfortable Brussels when I joined the news agency after university, the lure of conflict zones was too great, and relaunched as a freelance commentator and broadcaster I covered a whole range of bloody situations, from Israel/Palestine to Central America and Angola. That was not because I revelled in the suffering. Quite the contrary. But I believed passionately that it needed to be reported, so people might learn that humanity should develop ways of resolving differences and rivalries more constructively. I still feel that today, as Vladimir Putin seems intent on infiltrating deeper into eastern Ukraine, alarming not just Kiev but several other of Russia’s neighbours. In the recent Clegg versus Farage EU IN/OUT debates in Britain, Nick Clegg stressed the importance of Britain’s EU membership for jobs — and of course that is true. But I shall also carry on talking about something that is not just related to the economy or livelihoods: the EU — enlarged a decade ago to take in formerly Communist states of central and eastern Europe — is a brilliant example of how to do things differently, about how to live togeter in peace, celebrating diversity. Fall back on nationalism, as Nigel Farage and some of his more unsavoury counterparts on the Continent would like us to do, will only lead to renewed tensions between peoples and, yes, the reappearance of the spectre of war.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »