Jonathan Fryer

Self-publishing: Pros and Cons

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 30th October, 2016

business-of-being-an-author-1As I had 14 books published by a variety of “traditional” publishers, I was quite surprised when my literary agent suggested that I should self-publish my latest book, the childhood memoir Eccles Cakes. It was so different from anything that I had written before that it did not sit neatly with my back catalogue (six of which books had in 2014 been reissued as paperbacks and ebooks by Thistle). He wasn’t sure there was a ready market for the memoir, but added cheerily that I would have complete control of the content and the cover, if I wished to go down the self-publishing route — and would earn proportionately more money if the book took off. It is worth pointing out that the days of generous publishers’ advances are over, unless one happens to be the latest hot new thing (preferably a young and attractive, and therefore promotable, female novelist). And as one gets 10% royalties at best on mainstream books, writing really does not make one rich, unless one is extremely lucky. In fact, according to a survey of writers’ earnings published last year by the Authors Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS), on whose Board I sit, average writers’ earnings have fallen sharply in recent years to a measly £11,000 a year. That’s nearly 30% down on a decade earlier. Moreover, publishers’ and media contracts are getting more and more tricky, often asking writers to surrender all their rights for a pittance — or even for nothing at all.

Eccles Cakes cover 1So, is self-publishing the answer? Like many people, I had been wary of the so-called Vanity presses, which charge authors thousands of pounds for producing a set number of copies of a book which may be nicely bound and printed on glossy paper, but won’t have been edited, and may well for the most part sit in boxes in the writer’s garage until he or she leaves this life. But, I was assured, as I made enquiries, things aren’t like that anymore. And indeed they are not. Of course, there are still some shady operators out there who are ready to fleece a lot of money off poor sods who are desperate to see their thoughts in print. But these days there are other, less expensive and more attractive options. As I am not confident in my technological skills I decided to plump for a company in England, PublishNation, that, for a set fee of £235 would format Eccles Cakes from a Word document and design a cover using a photo that I supplied. In a surprisingly short period of time I had a proof copy to correct, from the printer Lulu (who physically produce a lot of self-published books), and once I had OK’d some small changes (mainly typos; we all make them), I was then able to order as many or few copies of the paperback as I wish — and can continue to do so. The orders are fulfilled in a matter of days, with delivery to my door. The cost ensures that I get a respectable margin when I sell copies personally to readers. Others can buy online from Amazon, which also did a kindle version of the book (all part of the original PublishNation package). The kindle version is particularly attractive to authors as one gets 70% royalties as long as the book is priced over a certain limit (mine is, at £3.99). The biggest surprise of all, though, was that these royalties start straight away, on a monthly basis, as people buy one’s book. So although I only “published” in mid-July, I got my first payment direct into my bank account from Amazon at the end of August and another one just now.

eccles-cakes-book-signingDoes this all sound too good to be true? Well, of course there are certain disadvantages. One needs to be a competent editor and proof-reader, or else be ready to employ someone to do that, otherwise your book is likely to be full of errors (though these can be corrected in all future copies). The biggest problem, though, is distribution and marketing. Mainstream publishers often still have reps, who tour the bookshops, promoting their wares. As a self-published author one has to do that oneself. Be brave, is what I say; I was delighted when I approached one bookshop that had stocked some of my earlier books when they came out and they agreed on the spot to take six copies. But particularly with memoirs, one needs to target people who know you or know about you. In my case, that meant Liberal Democrat activists (I did a signing at the Brighton autumn conference last month) and both my old school and university college, as well as my freshly-located birth family and close friends. A couple of reviews have appeared in linked publications, as well as diary items. Significantly, good reviews have appeared on Amazon and Goodreads; authors are well-advised to join and engage with the latter; the more such reviews you get, the better your book is likely to do. But the real challenge is to master social media: to let people out there know your book is available — and why they might be interested to read it. I mention it quite frequently on twitter (with a link to the Amazon order page) and I have created a dedicated Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/eccles.cakes.2016 (which has a shopping button). It’s still early days, but even if I have not yet made a fortune from self-publishing, my experience has been overwhelmingly positive to date, and I did have total control of both cover and content.

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Richmond Park up and Running

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 27th October, 2016

richmond-park-byelectionYesterday afternoon I went to the Richmond Park and North Kingston LibDem HQ in Mortlake to collect a couple of delivery rounds and was pleased later to learn that a hundred other people passed through the doors during the course of the day. With polling announced for 1 December, this is likely to be the fiercest-fought by-election since Brent East in 2003, at which the LibDems’ Sarah Teather snatched the seat from Labour. On that occasion, the LibDems benefited from the fact that the campaign was long drawn out, enabling the party to gain momentum. That is unlikely to be the case in Richmond Park, yet this new by-election does offer a potentially perfect storm. The Conservative government has announced plans to build a third runway at Heathrow Airport, in the face of strong local opposition, and although Zac Goldsmith has resigned as MP to fight as an Independent anti-Heathrow candidate the Conservative Party is not going to field a candidate against him, underlining the fact that he is a Conservative and therefore cannot escape blame for what the government is doing. Interestingly, UKIP is not going to oppose him either, which highlights the fact that Goldsmith is an arch-Brexiteer — unlike three quarters of the constituency’s electorate. This inevitably means that Brexit and the Conservative government’s incompetent handling of the whole sad business is going to be central to the by-election campaign. As this is a seat that the LibDems held until 2010, we can expect the windows and gardens of Richmond Park and North Kingston to become a sea of LibDem yellow over the next few weeks — and battalions of party activists pounding he streets and knocking on doors. This is most definitely one to watch.

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Time for Brexiteers to Fess up

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 23rd October, 2016

theresa-villiersIt’s unusual for banks to make the news over a weekend but social media are abuzz over reports that several major banks are considering leaving London, to relocate somewhere on the continent, to ensure that they can continue to enjoy the full benefits of being part of the European single market. During the EU referendum campaign, many of us on the Remain side warned that this might happen, but the Brexiteers poo-pooed the notion, saying that even if Britain leaves the EU it will continue to be able to trade exactly as before, whether in goods or services. Such an argument flies in the face of the realities of the single market, but alas too many Brexiteers were not prepared to engage with facts, especially if they were presented by people who actually knew what they were talking about. Similarly, also this weekend, the EU Agriculture Commissioner, Phil Hogan, announced categorically that the open border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Eire will not be able to function as it does now once the UK is outside the EU. I argued that point against the then Northern Ireland Minister, Theresa Villiers, at a public meeting in Barnet during the referendum campaign and she got thunderous applause from the audience by declaring that there would be absolutely no change to the open border policy after Brexit. What she said was populist codswallop, maintaining that we can have our cake and eat it.

Boris JohnsonBoris Johnson was a serial offender in that respect, making all sorts of fanciful claims during the campaign about how green the grass will be on the other side of the Brexit fence, in total contradiction to the facts. Unsurprisingly, PM Theresa May got a very frosty reception from her 27 EU colleagues at the recent EU Council, so maybe the penny is beginning to drop with her that Brexit is both economically and politically disastrous for Britain. It has already caused the pound to plummet; just wait to hear the howls of protest when inflation starts to rocket as a result of higher-priced imports.  I very much doubt that Mrs May has the courage to say, as she should, “This is madness. Let’s pull back from the brink before banks leave and the economy contracts.” But until she does, the Brexiteers like Boris Johnson and Theresa Villiers should fess up and tell the British public and the more rabid elements of the national media that they lied, repeatedly, during the referendum campaign and that they are sorry, and that whatever unsatisfactory deal is cobbled together over the next two years or so should be put before the electorate to ask whether they really prefer that to staying in the EU, with all the benefits that that brings.

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Britain in the World

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 21st October, 2016

britain-in-the-worldThe Liberal Democrats pride themselves on being the most internationalist of Britain’s political parties and a liberal, internationalist voice is going to be needed more than ever as the United Kingdom and several other parts of the world seem to be heading towards narrow nationalism and illiberal tendencies. Buoyed by last night’s result in the Witney by-election — where the LibDem candidate Liz Leffman quadrupled the party’s vote share, standing on a pro-EU ticket in former Prime Minister David Cameron’s seat — the new LibDem working group on Britain in the World held its inaugural meeting at party headquarters today, to begin a process that will culminate in a policy paper being taken to next autumn’s party conference in Bournemouth, effectively marking out the LibDem approach to foreign affairs up to the 2020 general election. About 17o people had applied to join the working group and the members chosen from that pool are an impressive bunch, with a wealth of expertise in foreign policy studies, diplomacy, the armed servies and the media, as well as parliamentary and Euro-parliamentary experience. An impressive proportion of the group’s members are LibDem newbies: people who only joined the Liberal Democrats since last year’s general election, even if several had long voted for the party. The group will meet regularly to hear evidence from expert witnesses, both internal and external, and to discuss issues with them. Today, we heard from two LibDem members of the House of Lords, William Wallace and Judith Jolly, who both held junior ministerial posts in the 2010-2015 Coalition government. In keeping with “Chatham House rules”, who said what shall remain confidential within the group, but I will post in general terms any interesting developments or insights over the next few months.

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Witney: A Golden Opportunity

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 19th October, 2016

img_1518Tomorrow the voters of Witney in Oxfordshire will be going to the polls in a by-election caused by the resignation of former Prime Minister David Cameron. Normally this would be safe Conservative territory (despite the fact that one previous incumbent defected to Labour), but these aren’t normal times. David Cameron made the disastrous mistake of calling June’s EU Referendum, convinced that he would win, and his successor as PM, Theresa May, seems determined to march down the road to a “hard Brexit” despite all the warnings from economists about the damage that will do to Britain’s GDP. Interestingly, West Oxfordshire (of which Witney is the administrative seat) voted for Remain in the Referendum, but the Tory candidate is a Brexiteer. All this could produce a perfect storm for the Liberal Democrats as the party  that is not afraid to show its European colours. The LibDem candidate, a personable local businesswoman and councillor, Liz Leffman, is well known, having fought the constituency in 2005. Several pro-EU groups have endorsed her and hundreds of LibDem volunteers have been pouring in daily to campaign for her. The Tories deliberately called the by-election quickly, to avoid any opposition head of steam building up, so it is probably not likely that Liz can win, but coming a very strong second would send a very powerful message to 10 Downing Street. And if Liz did pull off an Orpington-style victory then the whole story of Brexit could be changed.

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UKIP’s Death Spiral?

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 18th October, 2016

steven-woolfeThe UKIP MEP, Steven Woolfe, who was favourite to become the party’s new leader, has dramatically quit UKIP, though he intends to stay on as an MEP (why wouldn’t he, given the salary and benefits?). He recently spent several days in hospital after a fracas in the European Parliament with one of his fellow UKIP MEPs and he probably needs to watch his back now. He stuck the knife into his colleagues, metaphorically, with his resignation by declaring that UKIP is in a “death spiral” and that is “ungovernable”. Diane James, UKIP’s version of Lady Jane Grey, recently gave up the leadership after only 18 days, saying she did not have the confidence of the party, even though she got a firm mandate from UKIP members. Meanwhile, Nigel Farage, twice the party’s leader, is in a caretaker role, though he seems to think advising US presidential candidate Donald Trump to be a higher priority. Farage famously is at odds with UKIP’s single Westminster MP, Douglas Carswell. So things are looking pretty dire. However, it would be unwise to write UKIP off (much as the Conservatives, in particular, would like to do). MEPs defecting or setting up their own party have been a feature of UKIP’s history over the past decade or so, but that did not stop them coming top of the poll in the UK in the European elections in 2014. Some people argue that now that the Conservative government unwittingly finds itself in a situation where it is aiming to oversee Brexit then UKIP ceases to have a purpose. But if Prime Minister Theresa May is unable to bring about the “hard Brexit” she indicated at the Tory party conference then UKIP may be able to rally the more hardline Brexiteers. And of course, if Brexit doesn’t happen — a slim possibility, but not impossible — then UKIP would definitely be re-energised — with Nigel Farage once again at the helm?article-2737206-20e2281200000578-660_634x450

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We Chose to Speak of War and Strife

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 16th October, 2016

we-chose-to-speak-of-war-and-strifeFew people would call John Simpson, the septuagenarian BBC World Affairs Editor, a shrinking violet. For several years there was even a BBC programme called Simpson’s World and fellow broadcasters like to rib him about the time he “liberated” Kabul in front of the camera. But the ribbing comes mainly from admiration for the solid body of work that Simpson has carried out, not least in dangerous war situations, such as in Baghdad or Sarajevo. He is very much the go-to face to explain conflicts to the viewer, in a way that Kate Adie used to be. His exploits and associated reflections have moreover been covered in a series of books recounting what it is like on the frontline of international news. However, his latest volume (We Chose to Speak of War and Strife, Bloomsbury, £25) is somewhat different, as it is essentially a celebration of the world of foreign correspondents past and present, from Henry Crabb Robinson onwards. Scores of names — many who will be familiar to avid TV viewers and newspaper readers — fill the book’s pages, moving not so much chronologically or geographically but thematically. Chapters have such headings as Journeys, Scoops, Taking Risks and Getting Involved. Some foreign correspondents, such as Martha Gelhorn and Marie Colvin, showed incredible ingenuity as well as bravery, the latter paying for it with her life.

john-simpson Rather a lot of Simpson’s subjects perish in the later chapters, which is partly a reflection of the way that attitudes to correspondents have changed. When I was a cub reporter stringing for the Manchester Evening News during the Vietnam War it never entered my head to wear camouflage or a flak-jacket. Both sides in the conflict wanted their story told and were eager to help. But these days, all too often journalists are themselves targets, either for hostage-taking or gruesome execution, not least by fanatical Islamist groups, if not just ending up as collateral damage on the battlefield. Simpson being Simpson, of course he interjects his own experiences into that of others, sometimes as colleagues, but often in a more editorial fashion. He betrays a certain competitiveness which has indeed characterises much of the relationship between foreign correspondents working for different organisations, but there is also compassion. He has his favourites among colleagues, including Lyse Doucet and Frank Gardner, as well as some by whom he has been less impressed. He rightly laments the fact that even as news outlets and platforms have multiplied in the digital age the resources that are devoted to employing and dispatching foreign correspondents has shrunk substantially. So in a sense one is left with a feeling at the end of this book that it something of a swan-song, not just for John Simpson but also for the profession. That would be a shame, to put it mildly, as there is so much out there in the big bad world that we need to know about. .

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Brexit and the Commonwealth

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 14th October, 2016

jf-speaking-at-upf-conference-smallYesterday I was a keynote speaker at a conference on Cultural Diplomacy and the Commonwealth hosted by the Universal Peace Federation (UPF) and the Institute for Cultural Diplomacy (ICD) in London. My brief was to address the consequences of Brexit for the Commonwealth; some Brexiteers had argued that leaving the EU would enable the UK to forge closer links, especially in trade, with countries such as Australia. But they glossed over the fact that whereas trade with the rest of the EU accounts for 44% of total UK trade that with Australia is only 1%, and the potential for great expansion is not there. Moreover, Australia has in recent decades recalibrated its own trading relationships to focus more on China and South East Asia.

During the referendum campaign, some UKIP supporters in the North of England were telling Muslims of Pakistani origin that after Brexit, EU migrants would no longer be able to come to the UK as a right and that therefore more people could come from Pakistan. But that flies in the face of the fact that the Conservative government is determined to reduce numbers of immigrants across the board. The prospects for Commonwealth students are discouraging as well, as Home Secretary Amber Rudd has said that she will make it harder for students to come, which incidentally is economically illiterate as they are a big boost to the UK’s economy and should not be included in immigration figures at all.

Parts of the Commonwealth have done well out of Britain’s EU membership as African, Caribbean and Pacific nations were able to benefit from the Lomé Convention aid and trade deal and its successors. That has been especially useful for small and island countries. When Britain leaves the EU it will no longer be a champion for Commonwealth countries’ concerns over such matters as sugar and bananas. Although Malta and Cyprus will still be able to speak up, being both EU and Commonwealth members, their voice is inevitably weaker than that of Britain, as the Cyprus High Commissioner, Euripides Evriviades pointed out in a speech following my own at the UPF/ICD event. The Conservative government appears not to have fully taken into account how significant the impact will be of not having a seat at the EU table at the myriad ministerial and other meetings that take place, thereby seriously weakening the country’s influence. Furthermore, the withdrawal process from the EU and the subsequent complex bilateral trade negotiations between Britain and its trading partners are going to consume most of the government’s time and energy for years to come, as well as costing a great deal of money.

[photo by Euripides Evriviades]

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A Closed or Open Brexit?

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 11th October, 2016

ciaran-devane-and-anSince the British EU Referendum in June there has been a lot of talk about “Hard Brexit” versus “Soft Brexit”, with Prime Minister Theresa May giving the impression that she favours the former, i.e. sacrificing access to the European single market in order to “get back control” of immigration. Remainers like myself not surprisingly think that is utter madness. But last night, at the British Council headquarters off Trafalgar Square, the Council’s CEO, Sir Ciaran Devane, asked an invited audience to think instead of the alternative between a “Closed Brexit” (with a more isolated Britain) or an “Open Brexit”, in which Britain would remain outward-looking and open not just for business but also for cultural interchange. Sir Ciaran was giving the Edmund Burke Lecture, sponsored by the venerable publication Annual Register and ProQuest, and made no secret of his own preference for Britain’s remaining in the EU, but if Brexit is going ahead then it is important that it proceeds in the most positive way possible. The British Council of course does have global reach, being active in around 150 countries and does far more than just promote British culture and values. Through its Young Arab Voices programme, for example, it is giving young people in the Middle East and North Africa skills that will help them express themselves. Other projects have a clearly developmental element of empowerment. Sir Ciaran lamented the fact that once Britain is out of the EU Ministers and officials will no longer be part of the regular meetings with our current 27 partners discussing all sorts of issues that impact on the creative industries. So it will be important to find other ways of exchanging information and views to prevent Britain becoming further isolated.

[photo: Sir Ciaran Devane and event chairman Alastair Niven]

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We Are Arrested

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 10th October, 2016

img_1484Silivri prison is a deliberately colourless place; the grey concrete, beige walls and lack of plants and even soil are all part of the system’s attempt to grind inmates down, to remove hope and joy from their lives and to drive them to obedience and conformity. In Silivri are thousands of Turkey’s political prisoners — people who dared to “insult” President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, or wrote critical pieces in newspapers or books, or who simply belonged to the Gulen movement, once Erdogan’s ally but now public enemy number 1. For three months, Can Dundar, Editor-in-chief of the prominent newspaper Cumhuriyet, was jailed in Silivri, after he published a piece exposing the covert shipment of arms to radical groups fighting against the regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria. Like many others, he was held in solitary confinement, his every movement monitored, his contact with the outside world restricted, his future uncertain, as there was a real possibility that he would be given a life’s sentence when his case came to court. However, he was able to write, on the back of regulation order forms for prison meals and acccessories, and his writings were transmitted to his newspaper and foreign media including the Guardian, as well as forming the basis of a prison diary, We Are Arrested (Biteback £14.99). Moreover, because of his status, supporters mobilised, demonstrations and vigils were held outside the prison gates and freedom of expression NGOs such as PEN and Amnesty lobbied on his behalf. Meanwhile, Dunbar had the chance to meditate on many things, from the nature of freedom to the importance of family relationships and the petty tyranny of power. This means that his book is at times lyrical, at other times polemical, but always moving. He was lucky, because a court ruled that his imprisonment was illegal and he was released. But others have not been so fortunate and many thousands of people are in jail in Turkey, for believing or writing the “wrong” things. Indeed, in the wake of this summer’s abortive coup, people are still being picked up and incarcerated every day.

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