Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Archive for January, 2019

Stan & Ollie *****

Posted by jonathanfryer on Saturday, 12th January, 2019

stan & ollieLaurel and Hardy were one of the great comic duos of the 20th century, their films huge box office sensations. But Jon S. Baird’s affectionate biopic, Stan & Ollie, covers their twilight months, when they were touring theatres in the British Isles, trying to resuscitate the old magic in a changing world newly enamoured of television. Steve Coogan and John C. Reilly were inspired casting for the lead roles, even if Coogan’s accent does occasionally go a bit Alan Partridge. They mimic perfectly some of Laurel and Hardy’s comic song and dance routines, though with a poignant edge of stars on the wane. The period settings are atmospheric and the film’s pacing immaculate, and there are some wonderful cameos such as Rufus Jones as an oleaginous Bernard Delfont and Nina Arianda as Stan’s vampish Russian wife. But the best thing of all is the chemistry between the two central characters, ranging from love through frustration to a certain degree of jealousy. There are some deliciously funny moments, but even more tender scenes that left many a teary eye in the audience I saw the film with, rooted in their seats until the credits were totally over.

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No, a General Election Is Not the Answer

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 10th January, 2019

jeremy corbyn 3The Leader of he Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn has made a speech calling for a general election, arguing that this is the most “practical and democratic” solution to the current Brexit impasse. Quite apart from the fact that almost all recent opinion polls suggest that Labour would not win such an election, however much Mr Corbyn may dream of being Prime Minister, with less than three months to go before EU Departure Day, a general election would be a time-consuming distraction from the matter at hand. Besides, it is hard to see how such an election would be brought about, as most of the Tory rebels who have inflicted a couple of significant defeats on the Government in recent days would not vote for an election, and it needs two thirds of the House of Commons to do so. After Jeremy Corbyn’s speech, Channel 4’s Jon Snow asked a very pertinent question about whether the Labour Leader has given thought to the young people — including those not old enough to vote in the 2016 EU Referendum — who overwhelmingly want to stay in the European Union and who back a People’s Vote. Mr Corbyn’s response was that young people would benefit from the policies of a Labour government, which completely misses the point. The sad fact is that Jeremy is a Brexiteer, despite his half-hearted support for Remain in 2016, and what he wants to try to deliver is a Labour Brexit. This again is cloud cuckoo land fantasy, as the EU has made perfectly clear that there cannot be a new Brexit negotiation. The deal brokered by the Conservative government is the only one on the table. So instead of fantasizing about going to the country in the hope of bringing about a Socialist Britain the Labour Leader should listen to his members and supporters, who by a large majority want to Remain, and back the campaign for a People’s Vote.

Posted in Brexit, Jeremy Corbyn, Labour, UK politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

Brexit Is Breaking Britain’s Politics

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 8th January, 2019

anna soubry demonstratorsI’m often on College Green, Westminster, filming TV interviews for Middle Eastern channels, but whereas the atmosphere there used to be rather jolly, things have recently taken a more sinister turn. One had become used to anti-Brexit campaigner Steve Bray photo-bombing shots and couldn’t help but smile when he turned up with an immense pole so that he could hold up his placards even when the BBC installed high gantries in an effort to thwart him. But what has been happening in recent days is of an entirely different nature and that is the aggressive behaviour of far-right Brexiteers — often wearing yellow high-vis jackets — heckling and threatening both politicians and journalists. Anna Soubry, the brave Conservative former Minister who has been calling for a People’s Vote on the Brexit “deal”, was called a Nazi by hecklers and closely followed by them after a TV interview in a most intimidating way. While police were around, they were low-key in their response, apparently unsure how to balance the traditional British attitude to free speech with the right of citizens to be protected against serious abuse, including death threats. Fifty MPs have reportedly urged the Metropolitan Police to be more protective and many of us have in the back of of our minds the dreadful murder of MP Jo Cox in the run-up to the 2016 EU Referendum. The current Brexit Minister, Steve Barclay, has argued that the bad behaviour by the far right is a reason why we should not have a People’s Vote, as public division would become even more strident if we did. But that is a profoundly undemocratic position to take, in my view. One should not give in to intimidation. Meanwhile, things are likely to get worse over the next few days, with a parliamentary vote on Mrs May’s deal scheduled for next Tuesday. If it is defeated — as is highly likely — then the country will enter into uncharted political territory; even the Prime Minister does not seem to have much clue what would happen next. All the more reason, therefore, to curb the activities of extremists who are threatening the peaceful conduct of political debate in this country. They claim they are defending British values (though their Britain is a white, racist construct), whereas in fact they are in danger of destroying them. Brexit is breaking Britain’s politics as well as trashing the country’s international reputation. The voices of reason, backed by the Law, must prevail.

Posted in Brexit, UK politics, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »