Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

Two Graves *****

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 10th June, 2018

Two GravesIt is said that revenge is a dish best served cold, but before anyone considers taking the law into their own hands in retribution for a crime or injury, it is best to note what Confucius had to say on the subject: “Before embarking on a journey of revenge, dig two graves” — in other words, one for the victim and one for oneself. That is the inspiration for the title of Gary Young’s first full-length feature film, Two Graves, which had its West End premiere at the British Urban Film Festival in the Curzon cinema in Soho last night. A middle-aged pathologist, Margaret (played by Cathy Tyson), can’t find closure on the death of her son until she has extracted a confession of murder from the young man, Finn (Neal Ward), whom she believes to be guilty, enlisting the help of a bitter young former junkie, Zoe (Katie Jarvis). But incapacitating him with an epidural and slicing off one of his fingers leads to a totally unexpected revelation and a nightmare sequence of events in which Finn’s father, a vicious gangster called Tommy (David Hayman, in truly sinister mode), becomes a key protagonist. By now, like in a Greek tragedy, it is clear that things are going to end badly, and as in a classical drama, despite some flashbacks, there is unity of time and place, as the action unfolds one day in the ruins of an abandoned shipyard. The horror and suspense are alleviated by a few flashes of black humour, but the tension is increased by shots of circling seagulls and a chilling soundtrack. This is film noir at its blackest. Remarkably, Two Graves is a début not only for its director but also for several of its actors, and moreover the whole thing was made with a budget of £500,000 — peanuts, by film production standards. Instead of costly special effects or other extravagances, the director and cinematographer (Adam Barnett) use some powerful still images and random shots — such as a pigeon up in the rafters — to unsettle the senses, Hitchcock-style. All in all, a remarkable achievement, with the impact of a punch in the gut.

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