Jonathan Fryer

Who Is Mohamed ElBaradei?

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 30th January, 2011

Though this week’s street protests in Egypt have conveyed a clear message, namely that the Egyptian people want President Hosni Mubarak to stand down, the movement has lacked a clear leader around whom it can coalesce. The name that has nonetheless been in the frame for some time has been Mohamed ElBaradei, the 68-year-old former head of the International Atomic Agency (IAEA), who has spent much of his professional life abroad, including a stint as part of Egypt’s mission to the United Nations in New York. He attracted some criticism earlier in the week for not stepping up forcefully as a potential replacement for Mubarak, and in fact only returning to Egypt very late in the process of what one can now call a Revolution, but it woud seem that he has been busy behind the scenes, building a wide coalition of opposition forces. That coalition includes more than a dozen political parties (though obviously not the ruling NDP) and, significantly, the Muslim Brotherhood, the Islamic force that is in principle outlawed but in practice plays a significant role in society. The Muslim Brotherhood has endorsed ElBaradei as a spokesman for this new coalition, which could pave the way to his becoming interim President — though for that to happen, Mubarak must stand down. If he wants to escape a worse fate, Mubarak would be well advised to do that as soon as possible, leaving the way open for ElBaradei and a transition to a more open and democratic society which is responsive to the Egyptian people’s real needs.

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10 Responses to “Who Is Mohamed ElBaradei?”

  1. [...] Who Is Mohamed ElBaradei? Jonathan Fryer: Though this week’s street protests in Egypt have conveyed a clear message, namely that the Egyptian people want President Hosni Mubarak to stand down, the movement has lacked a clear leader around whom it can coalesce. The name that has nonetheless been in the frame for some time has been Mohamed ElBaradei, the 68-year-old former … – Readmore [...]

  2. Elbaradei said

    [...] Who Is Mohamed ElBaradei? Jonathan Fryer: Though this week’s street protests in Egypt have conveyed a clear message, namely that the Egyptian people want President Hosni Mubarak to stand down, the movement has lacked a clear leader around whom it can coalesce. The name that has nonetheless been in the frame for some time has been Mohamed ElBaradei, the 68-year-old former … – Readmore [...]

  3. [...] been in the frame for some time has been Mohamed ElBaradei, the 68-year-old former … – ReadmoreElBaradei says Mubarak must leave office "today" – Democratic …: Source: [b]Reuters[/b] [...]

  4. Luis Vega said

    Although it would be great to see an individual with sound democratic principles rise to power during Egypt’s crisis if history is guide it will be a military strongman (still unknown) guiding the land of the pharaohs out of its current crisis. An Egyptian Pervez Musharraf or Hugo Chavez seems to the most likely development out of Cairo’s anarchy as the nation navigates towards a real democratic system in the future. Why? Because no foreign power or entity, without accusations of empire-building, can tell president Mubarak to get out of town. Only one of Egypt’s top military officers can and there’s a capable bench of capable Egyptian military men waiting for the right moment to act.

    Yes, I know it does not sound enlightening coming from a journalist (I’m no liberal) but prolonging the current situation with the real danger of increasing the loss of human life is not an option I would support either. Two bad choices perhaps but if getting Mubarak out is the objective allowing the Egyptian military to do it professionally is the best choice for all – the sooner the better.

    After all “their future is now”: http://english.people.com.cn/90001/98705/100621/7263171.html

  5. who is Mohmed El Baradei vry one please convince me that this man is miracles makers the one who wlll solve all the egyptians broplims . the man does not know any think about egypt . h is like me live all his life out off egypt and sudinly h have all salutations for the trbled egypt. I am not going to say nothing about Mr Baradei rolles in Iraque and his contrebutions for leaks of documents to israile and th americans. the man can not and well not do nothing to egypt and the egyptians go backe home to Brussle . go to egypt when you can give your other nationalty. sorry Mr oldy the gyptian needs some globle broplemes it happend in greese, to England , France, and evry where comes nw man to save county the hero the savear of italy barlsony the saviear of englad cameron and kelges and now the saviers of gypt El Baradei man you idieas wll not make no deffrants to the poor Egyptian go and leve th rest of your live in burssel at pease you nearly 70 years old.

  6. A handful of wisely chosen words but I’m not sure it really answers the question of who is ElBaredi. I’ve had a go myself, it’s not that comprehensive either but it puts a little more flesh on the bones:

    http://whoruleswhere.com/2011/01/28/sidi-bouzid/

  7. 防音 said

    So he is really a very good man?

    God answer me please.

  8. sugar said

    Egyptian pple didn’t need another president who cant hear who cannot understand the real need of pple, they need more than change of the face
    who is Mohammad Elbaradie what he konw about the egyptian ??

  9. Luis Vega said

    Monday, 31st January, 2011 at 6:50 am – Ditto
    Although it would be great to see an individual with sound democratic principles rise to power during Egypt’s crisis if history is guide it will be a military strongman (still unknown) guiding the land of the pharaohs out of its current crisis. An Egyptian Pervez Musharraf or Hugo Chavez seems to the most likely development out of Cairo’s anarchy as the nation navigates towards a real democratic system in the future. Why? Because no foreign power or entity, without accusations of empire-building, can tell president Mubarak to get out of town. Only one of Egypt’s top military officers can and there’s a bench of capable Egyptian military men waiting for the right moment to act.

    Yes, I know it does not sound enlightening coming from a journalist (I’m no liberal) but prolonging the current situation with the real danger of increasing the loss of human life is not an option I would support either. Two bad choices perhaps but if getting Mubarak out is the objective allowing the Egyptian military to do it professionally is the best choice for all – the sooner the better.

    After all “their future is now”: http://english.people.com.cn/90001/98705/100621/7263171.html

  10. What would be great is if the government opened up venues for the throngs to congregate and form their own political parties so that they can run candidates of their own come September. Perhaps a constitutional reform where the top 3-5 popular vote getters would then compete for 60% of parliamentary vote to secure presidency and #2 gets VP spot (with no real powers).

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