Jonathan Fryer

Writer, Lecturer, Broadcaster and Liberal Democrat Politician

1938 Hitler’s Gamble

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 6th August, 2009

1938The British historian Giles MacDonogh’s last acclaimed book After the Reich was an admirable study of the disruption and misery prevalent in continental Europe that followed the defeat of Nazi Germany. Few nations came out smelling of roses in their treatment of the hordes of refugees then, not to mention the misdmeanours of the victorious armies. So there is a pleasing reverse symmetry in the conception of Giles’ latest offering, 1938 Hitler’s Gamble (Constable, 20 pounds), which charts month by month the prelude to the Second World War while demonstrating just how shitty almost everyone was towards the Jews. Inevitably, the canvass becomes a little cluttered, as the tale has to embrace the Anschluss of Austria, and the betrayal and dismemberment of Czechoslovakia as well as the central theme of increasingly institutionalised anti-semitism. But the author is good at presenting telling details and poignant vignettes in sometimes journalistic prose that is vivid and effective. I winced at the description of Neville Chamberlain as Britain’s Head of State, but such occasional slips aside, this is a gripping and at times disturbing read. At least there are some genuine human souls in evidence, including British and American Quakers who were involved in organising the Kindertransporte evacuating German Jewish children to safety as well as good upper class Germans who realised early on just what a ghastly — and dangerous — little man Adolf Hitler was.

One Response to “1938 Hitler’s Gamble”

  1. Hm, makes sense. I like your form of writing, its different, in a good way.

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