Jonathan Fryer

Posts Tagged ‘Greece’

Rethinking European Treasures

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 15th January, 2014

Tsiaras ParthenonEurope is blessed with myriad iconic historic sites, from the Parthenon in Athens to the leaning tower of Pisa, all instantly recognisable even to people who have never been there. But perhaps because they are so well known and so frequently photographed we tend to take them for granted. However, the US-born Greek artist Philip Tsiaras has deconstructed these and other landmark images by adding extraneous elements, such as stones or brightly coloured confetti, so that we are forced to review what we see with a fresh eye. His prints and photographs are on display until the end of this month at the 12 Star Gallery at Europe House in Westminster until the end of the month in an exhibition, “European Treasures”, opened last night in the presence of the artist and the Greek Ambassador. As Greece has just taken over the six-month rotating presidency of the European Union it was a fitting way of kicking off the gallery’s year. Philip Tsiaras is prolific and works in a variety of media, exhibiting and travelling widely out of his bases in New York and London. He told me at the vernissage that he loves the buzz of London and surprised me by praising the UK government’s decision to impose a £50,000 annual levy on wealthy foreign residents, on the grounds that then they are left alone, whereas in the US the taxman is always digging around trying to find out how much income and wealth the person really has so as to rake in more.

Link: http://www.europe.org.uk/2014/01/08/european-treasures-by-philip-tsiaras/

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

The EU’s Next Six Months

Posted by jonathanfryer on Monday, 17th December, 2012

Ireland is scheduled to take over the six-month rotating presidency of the European Union on 1 January, followed by Lithuania in July 2013 and Greece in January 2014. Whilst the third, in particular, might raise some eye-brows in fact all three governments in Dublin, Vilnius and Athens are well advanced in their plans and priorities. Here’s what the European Movement has to say about it in its latest Euro-briefing:

Euro-move header

The Programme of the next 3 EU Council Presidencies.
European CouncilLast week the next 3 Presidencies of the Council of Ministers, the so-called ‘Trio’ of Ireland, Lithuania and Greece, presented in Brussels their work programme. In the next 18 months the main priorities of the Council are to further restore the economic stability across the EU and to build strong foundations for sustainable jobs and for long lasting economic growth. The Irish Presidency, which will take over the helm on 1 January 2013, will focus on issues related to the Digital Agenda, the EU’s Single Market, multi and bilateral trade agreements (such as EU-US Trade Agreement) and the Banking Union. The new Presidency will be working closely together with the European Council and the Commission in order to set up long-term plans and operational programmes. Due to the financial, economic and sovereign debt challenges of the past three years, the EU has been working on creating the conditions for economic recovery and to re-launch growth and investment. Support for job creation and social cohesion, with special emphasis on youth unemployment, will be the focus of the forthcoming Presidencies.
EU Irish presidencyStarting off, the Irish Presidency will be working to agree on the remaining proposals of the Single Market Act (SMA I) and to progress proposals for the second Single Market Act (SMA II). The aim is to improve the competitiveness of the EU’s industry. The Irish Presidency will put a strong emphasis on supporting the development and competitiveness of the SME sector, reducing red tape, as well as facilitating cross-border trade and access to finance. This is one of the aims of the EU’s new COSME initiative (Programme for the Competitiveness of Enterprises and Small and Medium-sized Enterprises) and of the Entrepreneurship Action Plan (to be published on 19th December 2012), which includes proposals on insolvency and second chance and entrepreneurial education.Top priority will be given to dossiers like public procurements and moving forward on the Digital Agenda, particularly in the areas of eCommerce (e-signatures and e-Identification), Intellectual Property Rights, cyber security and low-cost high-speed broadband. The implementation of the EU’s Digital Agenda and the better functioning of the Digital Single Market offer huge potential for job creation in a yet to be fully taped area of economic activity. The Digital Agenda can foster cross-border commerce as well as new developments within the IT sector.
EMUWith regards to the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU), the upcoming Presidencies of the Council plan to work on completing the banking union and setting up a Single Supervisory Mechanism. The Council will also continue efforts towards fiscal consolidation and a better co-ordination of the Member States’ economic policies. The so-called ˜two pack” on economic governance will be one of the main priority areas (if final agreement with the European Parliament hasn’t already been reached under the Cypriot presidency). Ireland will steer the third European Semester of scrutiny of member states’ economic and fiscal policies and ensure that Member States, through the Annual Growth Survey process, stay on track to reach the objectives of sustainable economic growth and social cohesion as set out in the Europe 2020 Strategy.
Horizon 2020In recognition of the important role research, development and innovation play in achieving sustainable growth and improving the EU’s competitiveness, the Council aims to conclude negotiations on the EU’s Horizon 2020 programme (which is a key EU funding programme, supporting European growth and innovation efforts in the context of the Europe 2020 strategy) and will also work to advance the completion of the European Research Area.
On trade, opening new markets with third countries through Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) will be a priority. Ireland will organize an informal Council in April 2013, which will focus on trade relations ahead of a formal Council in June. The Presidency would like to see a mandate adopted during the next six months to launch talks for a free trade agreement with the United States. The Irish also hope that further progress could be made towards concluding FTAs between the EU and Japan, Singapore and Canada.
Last but not least, the multi-annual financial framework (MFF) for 2014-2020 will have to be discussed again by the European Council in February or March. Implementation of many of the Presidencies’ priorities depends on adopting a 7-year EU budget that is both fit for purpose and can support economic recovery and growth by underpinning areas such as regional cohesion and development and innovation.
For more details on the Presidential Programme, please visit:

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Vicky Pryce’s Debt Write-offs

Posted by jonathanfryer on Wednesday, 28th November, 2012

Though many — perhaps too many — Brits rub their hands in glee that the UK is not part of the troubled eurozone, and therefore may sometimes benefit from currency fluctuations, only UKIP MEPs and other delusionists could relish the thought of the single currency’s collapse. “Europe”, as so many in Britain continue to refer to the Continent, as if we are somehow not part of it, is still the biggest single market for British goods and is likely to remain so for some time, despite the rise of the BRICs — Brazil, Russia, India and China. Moreover, those who would like us to become another Norway, being part of the European economic area but having no say in the rules and regulations that govern it, are positively unpatriotic, in my view. I was glad that Vicky Pryce, former Chief Economist at the Department of Trade and Industry and later working with Vince Cable at the Department of Business and Skills, stressed, at a Pizza and Politics put on by Islington Liberal Democrats this evening, that the UK is far better in than out when it comes to the EU. The author of a recently acclaimed book, Greekonomics*, she has since her departure from government employment become something of a guru on what is happening in Europe’s economy, with particular in relation to Greece, whence she originally hails. Indeed, she is forever popping up on the TV and radio as the one commentator who knows what she is talking about on the subject, yet does not slag off her compatriots as good-for-nothing lazy tax-dodgers. That is, alas, the image still in the minds of many Germans, for example, though they would do well to acknowledge just how well Germany has done out of the single currency — selling goods left, right and centre — even if they are now expected to bail out the declining European periphery. I was struck by Vicky’s comments about the possibility of the need for a debt write-off for Greece and possibly some others, as their debt levels are unsustainable and will only drive them further into the sloough of despond. I was reminded so strongly as she spoke of the Latin American debt crisis that I used to commentate on for the BBC in the late 1980s. I asked her whether she could ever envisage Britain during the euro — as Peter Mandelson, amongst others, have suggested. She was cautious about the possibility — more so than myself — but she didn’t rule it out completely.

* Biteback Publishing

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

St Matthew’s Epistle on the Economy

Posted by jonathanfryer on Friday, 17th February, 2012

Since Matthew Oakeshott stood down as the Liberal Democrat Treasury spokesman in the House of Lords — almost exactly a year ago — he has enjoyed the luxury of saying exactly what he thinks about the way the Coalition government is approaching the ongoing financial and economic crisis, not least regarding the shortcomings of the Project Merlin approach to banks which have not been lending enough to small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), which would be a key element in any sustainable recovery. He has thus attracted a great deal of media attention. In fact, it has been rather useful for the LibDems to have Matthew as an ‘insider-outsider’, with a proven track record in investment management in the City (particularly relating to property), as he is able to speak out about issues in a way that no LibDem Minister could. Matthew comes from the Social Democrat branch of the Liberal Democrat family and still holds his one-time boss and mentor, the late Roy Jenkins, in high regard. He is an enthusiastic supporter of Vince Cable’s proposed ‘mansion tax’ (a tax on homes worth more than £2 million pounds) as a step in the direction of moving taxation away solely from earned income towards wealth. Indeed, a substantial chunk of his speech at tonight’s dinner of the Gladstone Club, at the National Liberal Club, was about taxation, as well as broader financial and economic issues. He said he was a supporter of the Coalition Agreement, but he does not think it has been totally adhered to. And he was very pleased about the work of the Vickers Commission on Banking, but obviously feels more needs to be implemented. Matthew is an ardent European, but interestingly told the Gladstone Club dinner that he thought that Greece ought to be allowed to leave the eurozone and then devalue.

http://gladstoneclub.org

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Will Hutton Effs and Blinds for Europe

Posted by jonathanfryer on Thursday, 18th February, 2010

There was an unusual twist to tonight’s Gladstone Club Annual Dinner, held at the National Liberal Club in Westminster, as the guest speaker, economics writer and Chief Executive of the Work Foundation, Will Hutton, asked each table to come up with things they wanted him to talk about in his speech. Not surprisingly, there were many questions about tax policy, the national deficit and the solidity (or otherwise) of China’s economic performance. But things got really heated when one young man — clearly a Euro-sceptic — asked in a rather convoluted way whether Will thought Britain’s ‘subscription’ to the EU was worth it and whether Greece wouldn’t be better off leaving the eurozone. At this, Will sprung into a spirited attack — liberally laced with effing and blinding — about the British public and their refusal to accept that much of what the media feeds them about the EU is lies. Some diners were stunned by the language — there are many, quite formal Conservative and non-aligned members of the Gladstone Club, as well as numerous Liberal Democrats — but Will got a hearty round of applause for his tirade from the Euro-enthusiasts present. It’s a long time since the David Lloyd George Room at the NLC has seen such fireworks, but I can’t feeling that both the Grand Old Man and Lloyd George himself would have been pleased with the passion, if not with all of the vocabulary.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Greece Turkey Rapprochement

Posted by jonathanfryer on Sunday, 3rd August, 2008

One striking feature in Istanbul these days is the number of Greek tourists, some of whom are actually wedding parties. Apparently it is the chic thing now for grand couples from Thessaloniki to get married by the Orthodox Patriarch in Istanbul, rekindling memories of times when the two communities, Greek and Turkish, were much more intermingled. After the First World War, there was a massive movement of population both ways and for much of the rest of the 20th century there was outright hostility between the two nations, especially after the Turkish intervention in Cyprus in 1974.

Indications of a possible thaw came with the Greek-Turkish ‘earthquake diplomacy’ after the disastrous 1999 Izmit quake, when Greece sent help, and since then there have been all sorts of bilateral contacts. Greece even switched its position vis-a-vis Turkey’s accession to the European Union, now actively suporting it at some time in the future. And most recently, there has been serious movement on Cyprus, following the change of president in Nicosia. It wasn’t all that long ago that a top Greek Cypriot orthodox figure was warning voters that if they supported the subequentrly scuppered Annan peace plan, they would not go to Heaven. But as we have seen in Northern Ireland, even intransigence is not a permanent condition.

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 101 other followers