Jonathan Fryer

The European Parliament’s New President

Posted by jonathanfryer on Tuesday, 17th January, 2012

As expected. Martin Schulz of the Socialist Group (S&D) was elected by MEPs to be the new President of the European Parliament today, taking over from former Polish Prime Minister Jerzy Buzek of the centre-right Christian Democrats (EPP). But his majority was not a landslide, despite the traditional stitch-up between the two main political groups in the parliament. Two British challengers, Diana Wallis from the LibDems (and therefore ALDE) and Nirj Deva of the Conservatives (ECR) did pick up quite a a lot of support from disaffected main party MEPs as well as from members of their own minority groups. The system is a farce, and does nothing to enhance the already shaky reputation of the European Parliament amongst the electorate across the EU’s 27 member states. Sir Graham Watson, former ALDE leader and now President of the ELDR (European Liberal Democrats, which also also embraces parties from European states outside the EU) was one of the first to tilt Don Quixote-like at the windmills of the Euro-parliamentary structure and Diana Wallis deserves credit for picking up the baton with panache. Meanwhile, few people in Britain, other than Euro-political nerds, will have any idea who Martin Schulz is. After all, most of the British electorate cannot name a single one of their own MEPs, so why should they have heard of a German one? But this is a pity, to say the least. The British public is poorly served by domestic media coverage of the European Parliament and its doings, in stark contrast to the citizens of Spain, for example. Anyway, it is worth knowing something about the man who will be presiding over sessions of the Parliament for the next two-and-a-half years. Born in an area where the German, Dutch and Belgian borders meet, Martin Schulz is unusual amongst MEPs in being a bookseller by profession; he ran his own bookshop in Wuerselen from 1982 to 1994. But he was politically motivated from an early age. He joined the German Social Democratic Party at the age of 19, and 12 years later, he was elected Mayor of Wuerselen. According to his official European Parliament potted biography, this experience ‘shaped my enthusiasm for Europe and the conviction that I wanted to help build and advance the European project.’ So no doubts there about how the new President wants to further the cause of European integration. But it will be interesting to see how he handles debates as he is a more fiery character than Jerzy Buzek, who has aptly been described by Andrew Duff MEP as ‘gentlemanly’. A few fireworks might be no bad thing, as they might attract to the Parliament a little more of the attention that it definitely deserves as it accrues more powers and influence in the decision- and law-making processes of the EU.

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One Response to “The European Parliament’s New President”

  1. Dan said

    Thanks for this post.

    You are completely correct about how our media does not serve this country well regarding not just the EU, but also domestic happenings which occur in other countries of Europe. I am always surprised when speaking to Spanish and Italian friends how well informed their media is on reporting the issues and appointments, and their knowledge of people and parties within the EU.

    I look on with despair at how the stronger voices of the euroskeptic/europhobic types tend to control the debate within our media, and how this has an effect on the public perception. I only have to engage in conversations with friends and work colleagues to see how this controls opinion. It is a lot of work to convince people that most of the rhetoric against the EU is not true.

    I fear we will never be able to get through the benefits of the Union whilst one side has the stronger influence, and how we who are pro-EU can convince people to take more of an active interest in what goes on rather than being indifferent to it.

    Obviously more interest from the public can help lead to pressure to help change those things about the system which needs re-adjustment, as well as actively engaging with the democratic processes we in Liberal Democracies hold so dear.

    And to also recognise those who work so hard to make it a success. :)

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